Egyptian presenter Riham Saeed banned for a year after ‘obesity’ insult  

Saeed is accused of saying that overweight women lost their femininity over time and were less happy. (courtesy: Sada el-Balad website)
Updated 29 August 2019

Egyptian presenter Riham Saeed banned for a year after ‘obesity’ insult  

DUBAI: The Supreme Council for Media Regulations in Egypt banned on Wednesday popular TV host, Riham Saeed, for one year after receiving complaints of the host’s “insulting comments” to overweight people.

It is claimed that Saeed, host of the late-night show “Sabaya,” said overweight people were a bad image of society and that many of those who are obese were a “burden on their families and the state.” 

The presenter is also accused of saying overweight women lose their femininity over time and were less happy. 

Her comments sparked outrage on social media, with users venting their anger and calling for a boycott of her show on Al-Hayah Channel.  

A hashtag bearing her name was created with calls for the channel to suspend the show and to sack Saeed.  

Saeed defended herself on her official Instagram account, saying she has been covering the issue of obesity on her show for years, asking why people were only reacting angrily now.

Fans of the host said she has always hosted overweight people on her show and helped them undergo corrective surgery to help with their weight issues. 


What We Are Reading Today: Texas Flood

Updated 10 December 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Texas Flood

AUTHORS: Alan Paul & Andy Aledort

Texas Flood by Alan Paul and Andy Aledort is a phenomenal biography of guitar legend Stevie Ray Vaughan that hits on every level, including interviews with those closest to him.

A review in The New York Times said: “An oral history is only as good as its sources, and Texas Flood is thorough and far-reaching, with Vaughan’s bandmates, crew and family taking center stage.”  It added: “Especially fascinating is Vaughan’s complicated relationship with his older brother, Jimmie,  and Vaughan’s ill-fated role in David Bowie’s band, an apparent big break that he quit because he was told he could not promote his debut album.”

The review said: “If there’s a disappointment in the book, it’s the lack of Vaughan’s own voice. Aledort interviewed him several times during his lifetime, but since those conversations were focused on specific projects, the quotes pulled for Texas Flood don’t leave much impression. Both authors are accomplished musicians and longtime contributors to Guitar World magazine, so occasionally things get a little gear-heavy.”