Swiss minister pessimistic on swift EU treaty

Swiss Economy Minister Guy Parmelin said the EU would weaken itself if it no longer cooperated with Switzerland on research. (AFP/File)
Updated 01 September 2019

Swiss minister pessimistic on swift EU treaty

  • The Swiss retaliated by banning EU venues from hosting Swiss stock trading

ZURICH: Switzerland is unlikely to strike a deal with the EU this year over a stalled partnership treaty, its economy minister said, extending an impasse that has hurt bilateral ties and disrupted cross-border share trading.

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker has urged Bern to wrap up the accord before his term ends on Oct. 31, when German politician Ursula von der Leyen is set to replace him.

The Swiss government has also said it would like to clinch a deal by then if three final points can be clarified.

Economy Minister Guy Parmelin, however, told the SonntagsZeitung newspaper that he was pessimistic, given that representatives of Swiss labor, employers and cantons had been unable to find common ground Switzerland could use in the talks. “We want a good solution that can win majority support, and that is not the case at the moment,” said Parmelin, a member of the right-wing and euroskeptic Swiss People’s Party.

“I don’t think we can wrap up this year. Our agenda and that of the EU allow a conclusion only next year at the earliest,” he said, citing Swiss elections in October, the creation of a new European Commission team and a Swiss referendum due next year on abolishing free movement of EU citizens.

Brussels blocked EU-based investors from trading on Swiss exchanges from July 1 as the row escalated over the treaty under which non-member Switzerland would routinely adopt the EU single market rules. The Swiss retaliated by banning EU venues from hosting Swiss stock trading.

In Bern, resistance to the treaty — negotiated over 4-1/2 years and Switzerland’s top foreign policy issue — encompasses the normally pro-Europe center-left to the anti-EU far right, which both see the pact infringing on Swiss sovereignty.

Failure to secure a treaty deal with its biggest trading partner means Switzerland gets no new access to the single market, its crucial export outlet. The partners have 120 bilateral economic accords that would stay in place but erode over time when they are not updated. Research cooperation could also stop.

“I think the EU would weaken itself if it no longer cooperated with Switzerland on research,” Parmelin said. “We are then forced to seek alternatives, perhaps along with Britain, if the EU remains dogmatic.”

Parmelin played down a Swiss media report that he would urge post-Brexit Britain to join the European Free Trade Association (EFTA), which groups together Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. 

He said some Swiss politicians liked the idea but the Swiss Cabinet had not discussed it.

“I have not heard that this is needed by Britain. If Britons want that, we will review it, but I believe it would be risky,” he said.

“Given its size, Britain would dominate the rest of EFTA.”


$8bn blow to Erdogan as investors flee Turkey

Updated 09 July 2020

$8bn blow to Erdogan as investors flee Turkey

  • Overseas holdings in Istanbul stock exchange are at lowest in 16 years

ANKARA: Foreign capital is flooding out of Turkey in a massive vote of no confidence in President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s economic competence.
Overseas investors have withdrawn nearly $8 billion from Turkish stocks since January, according to Central Bank statistics, reducing foreign investment in the Istanbul stock exchange from $32.3 billion to $24.4 billion.
As recently as 2013, the figure was $82 billion, and foreign investors now own less than 50 percent of stocks for the first time in 16 years.
“Foreign investment has left Turkey for several reasons, both internal and external,” Win Thin, global head of currency strategy at Brown Brothers Harriman, told Arab News.
“Externally, investors fled riskier assets like emerging markets during the height of the coronavirus pandemic. Some of those flows are returning, but investors are being much more discerning and Turkey does not seem so attractive.”
In terms of internal factors, Thin said that Turkish policymakers had made it hard for foreign investors to transact in Turkey. “This includes real money clients, not just speculative.
“By implementing ad hoc measures to try and limit speculative activity, Turkey has made it hard for real money as well. Besides these problems, Turkey’s fundamentals remain poor compared to much of the emerging markets.”
Erdogan allies claim international players are manipulating the Istanbul stock exchange through automated trading, and have demanded action to make it difficult for them to trade in Turkish assets.
Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan, Merrill Lynch, Barclays and Credit Suisse were banned this month from short-selling stocks for up to three months, and this year local lenders were briefly banned by the banking regulator from trading in Turkish lira with Citigroup, BNP Paribas and UBS
JPMorgan was investigated by Turkish authorities last year after the bank published a report that advised its clients to short sell the Turkish lira.
MSCI, the provider of research-based indexes and analytics, warned last month that it may relegate Turkey from emerging market status to frontier-market status because of bans on short selling and stock lending.
With the market becoming less transparent, overseas fund managers, especially with short-term portfolios, are unenthusiastic about the Turkish market and are becoming more concerned about any forthcoming introduction of other liquidity restrictions.
The exodus of foreign capital is likely to undermine Turkey’s drive for economic growth, especially during the coronavirus pandemic when employment and investment levels have gone down, with the Turkish lira facing serious volatility.