Severing ties with Qatar is Saudi Arabia’s sovereign right and protects its security

Severing ties with Qatar is Saudi Arabia’s sovereign right under international law, Saudi Press Agency said on Saturday. (Shutterstock)
Updated 07 September 2019
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Severing ties with Qatar is Saudi Arabia’s sovereign right and protects its security

  • The Anti-Terror Quartet of Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and Egypt have operated a diplomatic, trade and travel boycott of Qatar since June 2017
  • Saudi Arabia reaffirmed its support for the security and stability of the Qatari people

RIYADH: Severing ties with Qatar is Saudi Arabia’s sovereign right under international law and protects its security from terrorist threats, Saudi Press Agency (SPA) said on Saturday.
Qatar has worked against Saudi Arabia secretly and publicly since 1995, and hosts and promotes terrorist groups such as Daesh, the Muslim Brotherhood and Al-Qaeda, the report stated.
The report also said that the Kingdom and other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries have continuously urged Doha to abide by the agreements it made in Riyadh in 2013 and 2014, and that it had failed to do so.
Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain withdrew their ambassadors from Qatar in March 2014 over its support for the Muslim Brotherhood and other terrorist groups. The ambassadors returned in November 2014 after Qatari authorities singed another agreement.
The Anti-Terror Quartet of Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain and Egypt have operated a diplomatic, trade and travel boycott of Qatar since June 2017.
 


Mike Pompeo lands in Jeddah for talks with Saudi officials on Aramco attacks

Updated 46 min 39 sec ago

Mike Pompeo lands in Jeddah for talks with Saudi officials on Aramco attacks

  • Pompeo described the drone and cruise missile strikes on Saturday as an 'Iranian attack'
  • Pompeo was met at Jeddah airport by Saudi Foreign Minister Ibrahim Al-Assaf. 

JEDDAH: US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo Wednesday described strikes on key Saudi oil installations as an “act of war” as he landed in Jeddah.

Pompeo described the drone and cruise missile strikes on Saturday as an “Iranian attack”.

He said it had not come from Yemen’s Iran-backed Houthi militants and that there was no evidence the attacks had been launched from Iraq.

Pompeo was met at Jeddah airport by Saudi Foreign Minister Ibrahim Al-Assaf. 

Earlier on Wednesday, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson said he had spoken with US President Donald Trump about the Aramco attack, and agreed that Iran must not be allowed to acquire a nuclear weapon.