Chemicals sector feels the pressure of attacks on oil facilities

The global petrochemical supply chain is braced for the fallout from the weekend attacks on the world’s biggest crude oil processing plant in Saudi Arabia. (Reuters)
Updated 17 September 2019

Chemicals sector feels the pressure of attacks on oil facilities

  • Now petrochemicals industry which relies on crude oil and natural gas to make different kinds of plastic

LONDON: The global petrochemical supply chain is braced for the fallout from the weekend attacks on the world’s biggest crude oil processing plant in Saudi Arabia.

The attacks shut down about 5.7 million barrels per day (bpd) of oil production, sending the price of crude rocketing on Monday. Now the petrochemicals industry which relies on crude oil and natural gas to make different kinds of plastic, is also feeling the impact.

“With associated gas supplies badly disrupted due to the acute pause in oil production after the drone attacks, ethane supply is particularly under threat, which in turn means ethylene supplies would be interrupted too,” said Wood Mackenzie Head of Polyesters Salmon Lee.

Several major Saudi petrochemical producers, including SABIC, Tasnee, Yansab and Saudi Kayan have disclosed curtailed feedstock supplies in the wake of the attacks on the Abqaiq processing plant, which processes crude from the Ghawar, Shaybah and Khurais fields.

Saudi petrochemical plants tap natural gas, known as ethane, to make building block petrochemicals such as ethylene, from which many types of plastic are manufactured.

Spot prices of petrochemical including monoethylene glycol (MEG) and polyethylene (PE) have jumped in Asia.

Saudi Arabia accounts for about 10 percent of the global supply of polyethylene, which is used to make everything from plastic bags to milk cartons.

The Kingdom exported about 87 percent of its production to global markets in 2018.


Oman’s sultan says government will work to reduce debt

Updated 23 February 2020

Oman’s sultan says government will work to reduce debt

DUBAI: Oman's Sultan Haitham bin Tariq al-Said said on Sunday the government would work to reduce public debt and restructure public institutions and companies to bolster the economy.
Haitham, in his second public speech since assuming power in January, said the government would create a national framework to tackle unemployment while addressing strained public finances.
"We will direct our financial resources in the best way that will guarantee reducing debt and increasing revenues," he said in the televised speech.
"We will also direct all government departments to adopt efficient governance that leads to a balanced, diversified and sustainable economy."
Rated junk by all three major credit rating agencies, Oman's debt to GDP ratio spiked to nearly 60% last year from around 15% in 2015, and could reach 70% by 2022, according to S&P Global Ratings.
The small oil producing country has relied heavily on debt to offset a widening deficit caused by lower crude prices. Also, the late Sultan Qaboos, who ruled Oman for nearly 50 years, held back on austerity measures.
The country has delayed introducing a 5% value added tax from 2019 to 2021, and economic diversification has been slow, with oil and gas accounting for over 70% of government revenues.
Last week, rating agency Fitch said Oman was budgeting for a higher deficit of 8.7% for 2020 despite its expectation of further asset-sale proceeds and some spending cuts.
"We are willing to take the necessary measures to restructure the state's administrative system and its legislation," Haitham said in his first speech since the mourning period for Qaboos ended, without elaborating.
He said there would be a full review of government companies to improve their business performance and competence.
Oman observers have said that if Haitham moves to decentralise power it would signal willingness to improve decision making. Like Qaboos, he holds the positions of finance minister and central bank chairman as well as premier, defence and foreign minister.