KSRelief chief presented with 2019 moderation award

Makkah Gov. Prince Khaled Al-Faisal announces the winner of the 2019 moderation award at a ceremony held on Wednesday in Jeddah. (SPA)
Updated 19 September 2019

KSRelief chief presented with 2019 moderation award

MAKKAH: The general supervisor of the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Center (KSRelief), Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, has been named the winner of the 2019 moderation award.

Makkah Gov. Prince Khaled Al-Faisal made the announcement at a ceremony held on Wednesday in Jeddah.

The award, in its third year, is considered one of the most important in promoting the values of moderation and combating extremism, both internally and externally.

Al-Rabeeah has held 13 positions that contributed to his selection for the award, most notably minister of health, and pediatric surgery consultant, a role in which he performed 47 operations for conjoined twins from 20 countries.

The Saudi National Siamese Twins Separation Program is a global reference and one of Saudi Arabia’s most distinguished medical humanitarian initiatives worldwide.

In December 1990, Al-Rabeeah hit local and international headlines after making history in the Kingdom by performing complex surgery to separate the first conjoined Saudi twins at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center in Riyadh.




Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah

The case of the conjoined Malaysian twins Ahmed and Mohammed was particularly demanding. The family of the two children appealed to the Kingdom’s government to conduct the separation operation, and Al-Rabeeah carried out successful surgery lasting 23.5 hours in September 2002, by royal request.

After taking over as general supervisor of KSRelief, Al-Rabeeah oversaw 176 projects in 37 countries, including key areas such as food security, health, water, sanitation, education, women, children, vaccination and shelter.

He also implemented the directives of King Salman, providing various humanitarian and relief programs and building partnerships and community support with other countries.

The center executed 1,050 projects in 44 countries in addition to 225 projects dedicated to women and 224 for children.


Saudi app fights fake promotions, discounts

Some stores raise the prices then claim they are offering discounts. (SPA)
Updated 30 September 2020

Saudi app fights fake promotions, discounts

  • Companies and online businesses can apply for a discount license and promote seasonal sales through the application

RIYADH: A new electronic app will now protect consumers against fake and illegal discount offers and promotions, said a spokesman for the Saudi Commerce Ministry.
The app will also let consumers check if sales are still valid and useable. If they are invalid, consumers can report violations directly to the ministry, he said on Tuesday.
The spokesman, Abdulrahman Al-Hussain, said that companies offering discounts are required to follow certain procedures. They must apply for a license, mention products covered by discounts, provide a list of product prices before and after discount, give a discount percentage and put a before and after prices on a product price tag, he said.
The e-discounts app also lists companies that have a license to offer discounts, and explains the types of discounts licensed by the ministry. The app can be accessed on smartphones.

HIGHLIGHT

The e-discounts app lists companies that have a license to offer discounts.

Another feature available on the app is the ability to search for consumables or companies and show the percentage and duration of discounts. It also allows consumers to find the location of a company through Google Maps.
“The ministry requires the companies to print the license of discounts and display it properly. For online stores, the license of discounts should be clearly shown on the website,” said Al-Hussain.
“Companies and online businesses can apply for a discount license and promote seasonal sales through the application. This service gives discounts, sales, and promotions more credibility,” he added.
Muhammad Al-Hamad, a former president of the Consumer Protection Association, said the ministry should double-check the prices before discounts and ensure there is a price tag showing the price and the value-added tax, as well as the discount percentage and price after tax.
“Some stores raise the prices then claim they are offering discounts. The consumer should search for the quality before the price and also ask if there is an aftersales service,” he said. “The consumer should also demand a receipt because this is the only proof showing that he or she has bought the product,” he added.