Iran assures FIFA that women can attend football qualifier

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FIFA President Gianni Infantino said that Iran has assured atht ‘as of the next international game of Iran, women will be allowed to enter football stadiums.’ (Reuters)
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An Iranian woman watches a football match at a cafe in Tehran on Sunday, September 15, 2019. (WANA via Reuters)
Updated 22 September 2019

Iran assures FIFA that women can attend football qualifier

  • FIFA traveled to Iran ahead of the weekend for talks on the matter of women and football
  • The Islamic republic has barred female spectators from football and other stadiums since 1981

MILAN: FIFA has been “assured” that Iran will lift its 40-year ban and allow women to attend a World Cup qualifying game next month.

Football’s governing body wants Iran to end its ban on women entering stadiums that breaches international football statutes prohibiting discrimination.

Global attention on the ban followed the death this month of a 29-year-old activist, Sahar Khodayari, who set herself on fire outside a courthouse. She had been detained for dressing as a man to enter a football stadium in Tehran and faced six months in prison.

“There is women’s football in Iran but we need Iranian women as well to be able to attend the men’s game,” FIFA President Gianni Infantino said in a speech at a conference on women’s football on Sunday. “And we need to push for that with respect but in a strong and forceful way. We cannot wait anymore.

“We have been assured, that as of the next international game of Iran, women will be allowed to enter football stadiums. This is something very important, it is 40 years that this has not happened, with a couple of exceptions, but it is important to move to the next level and to the next stage.”

FIFA sent an inspection team to Iran this week to meet government and football officials ahead of Iran’s match against Cambodia at the 78,000-capacity Azadi Stadium on Oct. 10 — its first home match of the 2022 qualifying competition.

Infantino’s comments drew praise from United States outgoing coach Jill Ellis, who was at the same FIFA conference in Milan, two months after leading the American women’s team to a second successive World Cup title.

“I think it’s huge,” Ellis said. “FIFA has enough of a pull and ability to influence change and I think it’s absolutely the right thing. I mean I don’t think there should be any discrimination period and to not allow women to go see football I think is, I just can’t even wrap my brain around it in terms of it being something. I think if FIFA can influence that, I think it’s great.”


FIFA may extend punishments globally after racism at Bulgaria-England match

Updated 31 min 31 sec ago

FIFA may extend punishments globally after racism at Bulgaria-England match

  • Racist incidents include monkey chants directed at black players
  • UEFA has opened disciplinary proceedings against Bulgaria for racist behavior

ZURICH: Football body FIFA on Tuesday said it may extend punishments globally after racist incidents, including monkey chants directed at black players, marred a match between Bulgaria and England.
“FIFA may extend worldwide any sanctions that a Confederation or Member Association imposes for racist incidents, such as those which occurred in Sofia during the UEFA EURO 2020 qualifier match between Bulgaria and England,” the Zurich-based organization said.
“FIFA therefore expects to be informed as soon as practicable regarding the relevant decisions of the UEFA disciplinary bodies in relation to this particular case,” it added. “This would allow any sanctions imposed to be extended worldwide.”
European football’s ruling body UEFA has opened disciplinary proceedings against Bulgaria for racist behavior, including Nazi salutes and chants, and against England for not providing enough traveling stewards.
The game, won 6-0 by England on Monday, was twice halted in the first half and a public announcement was made under UEFA’s three-step protocol for dealing with racist incidents during matches.
FIFA President Gianni Infantino said more needed to be done to tackle the “obnoxious disease” of racism which seemed to be getting worse.
“I call on all football governing bodies to join us and think together of new, stronger and more effective ways to eradicate racism in football,” he said.
Competition organizers should enact regulations which envisage life bans from stadiums for those who are found guilty of racist behavior at a football match, Infantino said.