Facebook tightens political ad rules in Singapore as election looms

Facebook last year started introducing several similar initiatives in various countries, including the United States and India. (File/AFP)
Updated 26 September 2019

Facebook tightens political ad rules in Singapore as election looms

  • Ads about social issues, elections or politics in Singapore should confirm their identity and location, and disclose who is responsible for the advertisement
  • Singapore has repeatedly said it is vulnerable to foreign interference in its domestic affairs

SINGAPORE: Social media giant Facebook Inc. said on Thursday it had implemented new rules for political advertisements in Singapore ahead of an election in the city-state expected within months.
The new rules require those who want to run ads about social issues, elections or politics in Singapore to confirm their identity and location, and disclose who is responsible for the advertisement.
Facebook will also require “Paid for by” disclaimers in advertisements, which will be stored in a searchable online library for seven years.
Under pressure from authorities around the world, Facebook last year started introducing several similar initiatives in various countries, including the United States and India, to increase oversight of political ads.
Singapore — which has been ruled by the People’s Action Party since it split from Malaysia in 1965 — has repeatedly said it is vulnerable to foreign interference in its domestic affairs.


TWITTER POLL: Wearing masks to be a norm even with availability of coronavirus vaccine

Updated 11 July 2020

TWITTER POLL: Wearing masks to be a norm even with availability of coronavirus vaccine

DUBAI: The World Health Organization has advised on the use of medical masks as to limit the spread of certain respiratory viral diseases, including COVID-19.

“Current information suggests that the two main routes of transmission of the COVID-19 virus are respiratory droplets and contact,” the global health body said in its advisory.

Masks can be used either for protection by healthy persons – to protect themselves from transmission – or by infected individuals to prevent onward transmission.

 

 

The WHO likewise advised that governments should encourage the wearing of masks where there is widespread transmission and physical distancing is difficult, especially that a vaccine for coronavirus has yet to be developed that could offer protection to individuals.

Wearing masks have become a norm that even the availability of a vaccine in the future would not deter almost half of Arab News readers that were polled – at 46.6 percent – compared with those who said they will ditch these protections – at 29 percent – once a coronavirus inoculation goes into market.

Almost a quarter of those that were polled meanwhile said they did not mind either way.

Reader @KaysarRoni said face masks is essential when going to the market, to shop or to pray in the mosques, but would be “harmful for health” when worn all the time.