General Motors, workers union to continue talks on new labor deal

Striking United Auto Workers members picket at the General Motors Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant on September 25, 2019 in Detroit, Michigan. (Getty Images/AFP)
Updated 30 September 2019

General Motors, workers union to continue talks on new labor deal

  • Members of United Auto Workers went on strike on September 16
  • The strike is the first nationwide walkout at GM since a two-day work stoppage in 2007

General Motors Co. and United Auto Workers (UAW) said they will continue talks on a new labor deal on Monday, as a strike by the union’s members enters its third week.
UAW members went on strike on Sept. 16 seeking higher pay, greater job security, a bigger share of the leading US automaker’s profit and protection of their health care benefits.
“Negotiations will resume first thing Monday morning and we will continue to look for solutions to reach an agreement,” said UAW, a union that represents the automaker’s 48,000 striking hourly workers in the United States.
GM said it would continue the talks aimed at reaching an agreement that “builds a stronger future for its employees and business.”
The strike is the first nationwide walkout at GM since a two-day work stoppage in 2007.
The UAW has been careful about deploying strikes to gain leverage in bargaining since a 54-day walkout that occurred in Flint, Michigan, in 1998 that cost GM more than $2 billion and accelerated the loss of UAW-GM jobs.


South Korea seeks arrest of Samsung heir in succession probe

Updated 04 June 2020

South Korea seeks arrest of Samsung heir in succession probe

  • Jay Y. Lee faces a return to jail just a little over two years after being released from detention

SEOUL: South Korean prosecutors have requested an arrest warrant against Samsung Group heir Jay Y. Lee, they said on Thursday, in the investigation of a controversial 2015 merger and alleged accounting fraud in a suspected bid to aid his succession plans.
The move spells fresh trouble for Lee, who, if arrested, faces a return to jail just a little over two years after being released from detention in February 2018.
Lee already faces trial on a charge of bribery aimed at winning support to succeed ailing group patriarch Lee Kun-hee, and which involved former President Park Geun-hye, and spent a year in detention until the bribery case was suspended in 2018.
Prosecutors said they sought Lee’s arrest on suspicions of stock price manipulation and audit rule violations, among other offenses.
In a statement, Lee’s lawyers expressed “deep regret” at the prosecution’s decision to seek his arrest, adding that he had fully cooperated with the investigation while Samsung was going through management crises.
Prosecutors have been investigating suspected accounting fraud at drug company Samsung Biologics after the Korean financial watchdog complained the firm’s value had been inflated by $3.7 billion in 2015.
Prosecutors contend the violation helped boost the value of its major owner, Cheil Industries, which counted Lee as its top shareholder, and merged with Samsung C&T, a de facto holding firm, Yonhap news agency said.
Samsung requested an outside review of the investigation to weigh the validity of the indictment and the Seoul Central District Prosecutors’ Office is following the necessary procedures, it said in a statement.
Last month, prosecutors questioned Lee, 51, over the latest investigation. He also apologized for a series of controversies around his succession planning.
Lee’s year in detention followed separate charges that he bribed Park to win government support for the 2015 merger which helped tighten his control of South Korea’s top conglomerate.