Katy Perry walks to the beat in Andrea Wazen footwear

Katy Perry is a judge on season three of the rebooted version of ‘American Idol.’ (Getty Images)
Updated 06 October 2019

Katy Perry walks to the beat in Andrea Wazen footwear

DUBAI: US pop superstar Katy Perry was spotted at the “American Idol” auditions in the US state of Georgia last week wearing a slinky pair of sandals all the way from Lebanon.

The “Never Really Over” crooner sat on the judging panel wearing a bold palm-print suit, which she paired with neon green mules by Lebanese footwear designer Andrea Wazen.

Styled by celebrity “image maker” Samantha Burkhart, Perry finished off her two-piece suit with a pair of Gloria PVC Mules by the Beirut-based brand. The singer, who is judging participants on season three of the rebooted version of “American Idol,” opted for bright coral-hued makeup and a chic, blonde bob to complete the summery look.

Many celebrities have been spotted sporting shoes by Wazen, including the American actress Lucy Hale at August’s Teen Choice Awards in California.

Back in June, the shoes were worn by model Ashley Graham at the Council of Fashion Designers of America awards ceremony. She paired her black heels with a custom-made Christian Siriano dress, with puffed sleeves and a form-fitting silhouette.

From model Emily Ratajkowski to Brazilian fashion influencer Camila Coelho, celebrities are flocking to Andrea Wazen for their footwear needs.

And it doesn’t end there, Wazen also created custom-made neon-green boots for Jennifer Lopez to wear during her “It’s My Party World Tour” this summer (and she worked on a pair of custom-made boots for rapper Cardi B just last week).

Wazen shared a snap of Lopez on her Instagram account at the time, captioning it: “I never imagined this day would come!! I remember dancing with my sisters to all her songs growing up (still do now). And now she’s dancing on stage in MY BOOTS!!! Feeling so blessed, thank you!”

The shoe designer was trained by leading footwear brands Rupert Sanderson and Christian Louboutin in London. Her shoes are now designed and produced in Beirut.

Wazen is not the only member of her family who has made headlines for her creativity, however. Her sister, Karen Wazen, launched an edgy eyewear line in December 2018. Earlier this year, British singer Dua Lipa was spotted wearing “The Glamorous” eyeglasses from Karen’s collection.


‘It Must Be Heaven’: Elia Suleiman’s sardonic take on the world

Suleiman, who plays the lead role as himself, explores identity, nationality and belonging. (Supplied)
Updated 23 October 2019

‘It Must Be Heaven’: Elia Suleiman’s sardonic take on the world

MUMBAI: Elia Suleiman’s “It Must Be Heaven,” which was screened at the Mumbai Film Festival, is pure cinema. Like his earlier works, here too the Palestinian director uses wit, sarcasm and minimalism, this time to present a series of vignettes that are funny but also a powerful lambast of the world we live in. Suleiman, who plays the lead role as himself, explores identity, nationality and belonging.

He says people worldwide now live in fear amid global geopolitical tensions. Today, checkpoints are just about everywhere: In airports, shopping malls, cinemas, highways — the list is endless.

“It Must Be Heaven” was screened at the Mumbai Film Festival. (Supplied) 

Suleiman’s earlier features, such as “Chronicle of a Disappearance” and “Divine Intervention,” showed us everyday life in the occupied Palestinian territories. This time, it is Paris and New York. 

The first scene is hilarious, with a bishop trying to enter a church with his followers. The gatekeeper on the other side of the heavy wooden door is probably too intoxicated and refuses to let the priest in, leading to a comical situation. Suleiman’s life in Nazareth is filled with such incidents — snippets that have been strung together to tell us of tension in society. Neighbors turn out to be selfish, and only generous when they know they are being watched. 

The Palestinian director uses wit, sarcasm and minimalism, to present a series of vignettes that are funny but also a powerful lambast of the world we live in. (Supplied)

In Paris, the cafes along the grand boulevards, and the young women who pass by, are typical of France’s capital. But a cut to Bastille Day, with tanks rolling by in a show of strength, jolts us back to harsh reality. In New York, Suleiman’s cab driver is excited at driving a Palestinian. 

The film has an interesting way of storytelling. The scenes begin as observational shots, but the camera quickly changes positions to show Suleiman watching from the other side of the room or a street. The camera then returns to where it first stood, and this back-and-forth movement is delightfully engaging.

The framing is so perfect, and the colors so bright and beautiful, that each scene looks magical. And as the director looks on at all this with his usual deadpan expression, a sardonic twitch at the corner of his mouth, we know all this is but illusion. There is bitter truth ahead!