Kim Kardashian christens her children in Armenia

The US reality television star Kim Kardashian on Monday baptised her children during a visit to her ancestral homeland Armenia. (AFP)
Updated 07 October 2019

Kim Kardashian christens her children in Armenia

  • US reality television star Kim Kardashian baptised her children during a visit to her ancestral homeland Armenia
  • She was accompanied by her four children and sister Kourtney Kardashian

ECHMIADZIN, Armenia: US reality television star Kim Kardashian baptised her children on Monday during a visit to her ancestral homeland Armenia.
Kardashian wore a tight-fitting beige dress and stopped to take pouting selfies with local fans as she left Holy Echmiadzin, the Caucasus nation’s main cathedral.
She was accompanied by her four children — aged four months to six years — and sister Kourtney Kardashian, according to an AFP photographer. Her husband, rapper Kanye West, was not present.
The visit was the star’s first to the nation since a 2015 trip marking the centenary of mass killings of Armenians that saw her husband give a chaotic, impromptu concert in capital Yerevan.
Armenia says an estimated 1.5 million ethnic Armenians were killed by Ottoman forces in what it calls a genocide — a term rejected by Turkey, which puts the death toll at 500,000, blaming it on World War I raging at the time and starvation.
Kardashian is due to give a speech on Tuesday at the World Congress on Information Technology (WCIT), which is being held in Armenia.
WCIT is organized by the World Information Technology & Services Alliance, a consortium of ICT associations from 83 countries, representing 90 percent of the industry, according to the congress’s website.
Kardashian’s Armenian ancestors on her father’s side emigrated to the United States from an area that now lies in Turkey.
Armenia was the first country in the world to adopt Christianity as an official religion, in the fourth century.


Comedy series ‘Detectorists’: Bingeworthy TV

The show was first broadcasted in 2014. (Supplied)
Updated 29 May 2020

Comedy series ‘Detectorists’: Bingeworthy TV

AMSTERDAM: Mackenzie Crook’s slow-burner comedy is centered around the Danebury Metal Detecting Club — a group of oddballs whose hobby/obsession is metal detecting (basically, spending their days in fields with a machine that lets them know if there is something metallic under the ground it is ‘sweeping’; if it beeps, the user then digs down to see what’s there — hoping for buried treasure, but usually discovering something far more prosaic, like a button).

It’s not easy to explain the appeal of “Detectorists”: There are no big comedy set-pieces or pratfalls, just hours of meticulously observed, beautifully crafted, low-key humor and sweetly touching moments, often set in unspectacular but wonderful countryside scenery. It’s not a bombastic, joke-per-minute sit com, it’s a subtle, understated examination of relationships of all kinds (albeit an extremely funny one).

The show is by Mackenzie Crook. (Supplied)

Much of the show’s considerable soul comes from the relationship between Andy (played by Crook) — a worker at a temp agency, struggling to make ends meet while pursuing his true passion of archaeology — and his best friend and fellow detectorist Lance. It’s a vivid portrayal of the gentler side of male bonding in which emotions may not often be openly stated, but nor are they buried. 

“Gentle” is an apt word for the show as a whole. Its humor is generous, rather than cruel. In the hands of another writer, the detectorists may have come across as loser misfits with sad lives. But Crook’s affection for eccentricity of all kinds shines through, and the obvious joy the little group takes in each others’ company is clear. They are like a (slightly dysfunctional) family — with the delightful Sheila (Sophie Thompson) as the group mother. She’s not a detectorist herself, but her husband Terry is the club president, and Sheila is happy to indulge and support him. Just as Terry will go dancing with Sheila, because he knows it’s important to her. 

The show is centered around the Danebury Metal Detecting Club. (Supplied)

Andy’s girlfriend (and later wife) Becky, a primary school teacher, is less enamored with the whole metal-detecting thing, feeling that it leaves him with little spare time and even less spare money. The story of this relationship, too, is wonderfully told, with Crook again eschewing melodramatic sit-com tropes in favor of realism.

Crook also deserves credit for knowing when to stop (just as Ricky Gervais did with “The Office,” in which Crook got his big break). The series’ three-season run is brilliantly judged — with one of those rare endings that seems entirely right for the show.