Palestinian, 21, wounded during clashes along Gaza border dies from injuries

Palestinian men wait at a police training center in Gaza City to undergo a physical fitness examination for police jobs. (AFP)
Updated 07 October 2019

Palestinian, 21, wounded during clashes along Gaza border dies from injuries

  • Israel in February decided to withhold around $10 million per month from revenues of some $190 million per month it collects on the behalf of the PA, triggering Abbas’s fury

GAZA CITY: A Palestinian wounded by Israeli fire during protests and clashes along the Gaza border in February has died from his injuries, the Health Ministry in the Hamas-run enclave said on Monday. Fadi Osama Hijazi, 21, was wounded during clashes east of Jabalia in the north of Gaza, the Health Ministry said.
Palestinians have been gathering for weekly demonstrations at various points along the border of the blockaded territory since March 2018.
At least 311 Palestinians have been killed by Israeli fire in Gaza since the protests began, the majority during the demonstrations and clashes.
Israeli excesses continued as Palestinian Pesident Mahmoud Abbas said he would discuss plans for new parliamentary elections with all factions, including Hamas.
Meeting with senior Palestinian leaders in Ramallah in the occupied West Bank, Abbas renewed a pledge to hold the polls — the first since 2006 — but without giving a time frame.
He announced they had formed committees to “communicate with the election commission and factions such as Hamas and all factions, as well as with the Israeli authorities.”
He said any elections should take place in “the West Bank, Jerusalem and the Gaza Strip.”
Hamas and Fatah have been at loggerheads since 2007, when Hamas seized Gaza and threw out Abbas’ forces, which retained control of the internationally recognized Palestinian government based in the West Bank. No parliamentary elections have been held since 2006, with the two sides trading blame. Multiple attempts at reconciliation have failed and analysts say new elections are impossible without improved relations. Hamas said in a statement on Saturday it did not “know what Abu Mazen means by general election.” The movement said it had already committed itself to elections. Abbas has previously pledged on multiple occasions to hold elections but without any results.
Meanwhile, Abbas also confirmed the Palestinian Authority (PA) had received on Sunday $1.5 billion shekels ($430 million) from Israel — representing taxes that had been withheld from the Jewish state.
Israel in February decided to withhold around $10 million per month from revenues of some $190 million per month it collects on the behalf of the PA, triggering Abbas’s fury. The money comes from customs duties levied on goods destined for Palestinian markets that transit through Israeli ports and constitutes more than 50 percent of the PA’s revenues.
Israel had said the money it was withholding corresponds to what the PA pays Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails, or their families.


Sudan’s deposed Bashir questioned over 1989 coup: lawyer

Updated 59 min 51 sec ago

Sudan’s deposed Bashir questioned over 1989 coup: lawyer

KHARTOUM: Sudan’s former president Omar Al-Bashir appeared on Tuesday before a prosecutors’ committee over the 1989 coup that brought him to power, his lawyer said.
Bashir was “brought to be investigated in the case of the alleged 1989 coup,” said his lawyer, Mohamed Al-Hassan, who did not attend the hearing.
The lawyer also told reporters that in his view the hearing was “not a judicial matter, it’s a political matter.”
In 1989, Bashir, a brigadier at the time, seized power in an Islamist-backed coup that toppled the elected government of prime minister Sadiq Al-Mahdi.
The former president was himself ousted by the army in April of this year after months of nationwide protests against his iron-fisted rule of three decades.
On November 12, Sudanese authorities filed charges against Bashir and some of his aides for “plotting” the 1989 coup. The prosecution established a special committee for the case.
If found guilty, he could face the death penalty or life imprisonment under Sudanese law.
Sudan is now ruled by a joint civilian and military sovereign council, which is tasked with overseeing a transition to civilian rule as demanded by the protest movement.
Bashir is being held in Kober prison in a separate case, for which he has been on trial since August, on charges of illegally acquiring and using foreign funds.
A verdict is due in that case on Saturday.
On Tuesday, Bashir was taken from Kober prison to the prosecutor’s office in a convoy under strong armed protection.
After the hearing, which lasted about an hour, a crowd gathered in front of the prosecutor’s office, chanting “Kober prison — the best place for you!” and “you killed people!“
Wearing the traditional white Sudanese jalabiya and turban, Bashir raised his hands to the crowd, before he set off back toward Kober in the convoy.
The veteran leader is also wanted by The Hague-based International Criminal Court on charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity over his role in the war in Sudan’s western Darfur region.
To date, Sudanese transitional authorities do not want to extradite the former leader to The Hague.