What We Are Reading Today: Beaten Down, Worked Up Steven Greenhouse

Updated 07 October 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Beaten Down, Worked Up Steven Greenhouse

Beaten Down, Worked Up — from longtime New York Times labor correspondent Steven Greenhouse — is an in-depth look at working men and women in America, the challenges they face, and how they can be re-empowered

Greenhouse writes in depth of the history and current state of American labor and specifically highlights labor unions. 

Greenhouse “probably knows more about what is happening in the American workplace than anybody else in the country, having covered labor as a journalist for two decades,” said Zephyr Teachout in a review for The New York Times. 

Teachout said Greenhouse “achieves a near-impossible task, producing a page-turning book that spans a century of worker strikes, without overcondensing or oversimplifying, and with plausible suggestions for the future.”

The review said Greenhouse “may be a great advocate for unions, but he has no patience for union insiders who have grown used to internal power, who ask for too little and focus too much attention on strategies designed to minimize damage.”


What We Are Reading Today: After the Last Border

Updated 09 August 2020

What We Are Reading Today: After the Last Border

Author: Jessica Goudreau

After the Last Border — written by Jessica Goudreau — is an intimate look at the lives of two women as they struggle for the 21st century American dream, having won the “golden ticket” to settle as refugees in Austin, Texas.
The book casts a light on the history of the refugee relocation process, and how it has changed throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.
The writer “tracks the human impacts of America’s ever-shifting refugee policy as both women narrowly escape from their home countries and begin the arduous but lifesaving process of resettling in Austin — a city that would show them the best and worst of what America has to offer,” said said a review in goodreads.com.
“These women are so empowering. Their stories can give others a lot of inspiration,” it added.
After the Last Border “offers a crash course in how shifts in public attitudes and, in turn, US policy have helped and hindered people desperate to escape the poverty or violence in their homelands,” Mimi Swartz said in a review for The New York Times.