China warns Apple against ‘reckless’ support of HK protesters

“Apple has to think about the consequences of its unwise and reckless decision,” a Chinese opinion piece said. (File/AFP)
Updated 09 October 2019

China warns Apple against ‘reckless’ support of HK protesters

  • China tolerates no dissent on the highly sensitive issue and has increasingly targeted foreign companies
  • Hong Kong has endured nearly four months of protests triggered by a now-scraped extradition bill

BEIJING: China’s state media accused Apple Wednesday of supporting pro-democracy protesters, warning the US tech giant would suffer consequences for its “unwise and reckless” decision, in an echo of campaigns against other Western firms.
An opinion piece in the People’s Daily, the mouthpiece of the ruling Communist Party, highlighted a transport app available on Apple’s store that it alleged helped protesters identify police in Hong Kong.
“Apple’s approval for the app obviously helps rioters,” the article said.
“Does this mean Apple intended to be an accomplice to the rioters?“
The article then cautioned that: “The map app is just the tip of the iceberg.”
It alleged that a song advocating “Hong Kong independence” had appeared on the “Apple Music Store” in the southern Chinese city, then issued an ominous warning.
“Nobody wants to drag Apple into the lingering unrest in Hong Kong. But people have reason to assume that Apple is mixing business with politics, and even illegal acts,” it said.
“Apple has to think about the consequences of its unwise and reckless decision,” the article said.
As with other campaigns led by state-run press against foreign firms for perceived support of the democracy movement in Hong Kong, comments on China’s strictly controlled Internet echoed those of the media.
“It definitely wasn’t an accident that Apple allowed HKmap.live online,” wrote one commentator on Weibo.
“(Apple) should know exactly what it’s doing... It seems that there is too little domestic pressure against Apple.”
Apple, which has a huge presence in China, did not immediately reply to an emailed request for comment.
Hong Kong has endured nearly four months of protests that were ignited by a now-scrapped plan to allow extraditions of criminal suspects to the mainland.
They snowballed into a movement calling for more democratic freedoms and police accountability, in the biggest challenge to China’s rule of Hong Kong since its handover from the British in 1997.
China tolerates no dissent on the highly sensitive issue and has in recent weeks increasingly targeted foreign companies and organizations for perceived support of the protesters.
The American National Basketball Association was this week targeted after the general manager of the Houston Rockets, Daryl Morey, posted a tweet supporting the protesters.
US jewelry brand Tiffany and Hong Kong’s flagship carrier, Cathay Pacific, have also been heavily criticized in China.


Malaysia to study impact of India’s planned trade action

A truck carrying oil palm fruits passes through Felda Sahabat plantation in Lahad Datu in Malaysia's state of Sabah on Borneo island, February 20, 2013. (REUTERS)
Updated 14 October 2019

Malaysia to study impact of India’s planned trade action

  • Malaysia’s key imports from India include petroleum products, live animals and meats, metals, chemicals and chemical products

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said his government will monitor the trade situation with India, which is reported to be considering trade curbs on the Southeast Asian nation over his criticism of actions in Kashmir, news wire Bernama reported.
Government and industry sources told Reuters last week that New Delhi is looking for ways to limit palm oil imports and other goods from Malaysia, in retaliation for Mahathir’s speech at the United Nations in September when he said India had “invaded and occupied” Jammu and Kashmir. Malaysia had said it did not receive “anything official” from India.
Mahathir said on Sunday his government will “study the impact of the action taken by India,” the government-owned Bernama said.
“They are exporting goods to Malaysia too. It’s not just one-way trade, it’s two-way trade,” Mahathir was quoted as saying in the report.
India is the world’s biggest importer of edible oils, and is the biggest buyer of Malaysian palm oil. It bought 3.9 million tons of Malaysian palm oil in the first nine months of 2019, according to data compiled by the Malaysian Palm Oil Board.
Malaysia’s key imports from India include petroleum products, live animals and meats, metals, chemicals and chemical products.