FIFA may extend punishments globally after racism at Bulgaria-England match

Police seen entering the new building of Bulgarian Football Union, Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2019. Criticized around Europe for the racist behavior of Bulgarian fans and under pressure from the country's prime minister, the president of the country's soccer federation resigned on Tuesday. (AP)
Updated 15 October 2019

FIFA may extend punishments globally after racism at Bulgaria-England match

  • Racist incidents include monkey chants directed at black players
  • UEFA has opened disciplinary proceedings against Bulgaria for racist behavior

ZURICH: Football body FIFA on Tuesday said it may extend punishments globally after racist incidents, including monkey chants directed at black players, marred a match between Bulgaria and England.
“FIFA may extend worldwide any sanctions that a Confederation or Member Association imposes for racist incidents, such as those which occurred in Sofia during the UEFA EURO 2020 qualifier match between Bulgaria and England,” the Zurich-based organization said.
“FIFA therefore expects to be informed as soon as practicable regarding the relevant decisions of the UEFA disciplinary bodies in relation to this particular case,” it added. “This would allow any sanctions imposed to be extended worldwide.”
European football’s ruling body UEFA has opened disciplinary proceedings against Bulgaria for racist behavior, including Nazi salutes and chants, and against England for not providing enough traveling stewards.
The game, won 6-0 by England on Monday, was twice halted in the first half and a public announcement was made under UEFA’s three-step protocol for dealing with racist incidents during matches.
FIFA President Gianni Infantino said more needed to be done to tackle the “obnoxious disease” of racism which seemed to be getting worse.
“I call on all football governing bodies to join us and think together of new, stronger and more effective ways to eradicate racism in football,” he said.
Competition organizers should enact regulations which envisage life bans from stadiums for those who are found guilty of racist behavior at a football match, Infantino said.


World number one Ashleigh Barty wary of US Open return

Updated 05 June 2020

World number one Ashleigh Barty wary of US Open return

  • Australian surged to the top of the rankings last year and has stayed there since
  • ‘I’d need to understand all of the information and advice ... before making a decision on the US events’

SYDNEY: World number one Ashleigh Barty voiced caution Friday about resuming tennis too soon, saying she needed more information before committing to the US Open in August.
The Australian, who surged to the top of the rankings last year and has stayed there since, said it was not just her but her entire team she must consider in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.
“It’s exciting that tennis is being talked about again and things are moving in the right direction for us to start competing,” she told the Sydney Morning Herald.
“But I’d need to understand all of the information and advice from the WTA and the USTA before making a decision on the US events.”
The WTA and ATP schedules have been on ice since March with action not set to resume until the end of July at the earliest.
Wimbledon was canceled for the first time since World War II, while the French Open has been shifted from May-June to September-October.
A decision about the US Open — played in New York, which has been a hotbed for the virus — is yet to be made, but its main draw is scheduled to begin on August 31.
Barty said she was concerned about travel exemptions for her support staff.
While players could be exempt from a 14-day quarantine period, it remains unclear whether that also applies to their teams.
“It’s not just me, it’s my team I have to consider,” she said.
On Thursday, Rafael Nadal insisted tennis should not start again “until the situation is completely safe.”
“If you told me to play the US Open today, I would say ‘no’,” said the Spaniard, who captured a fourth US Open and 19th major in New York last year.
“In a few months, I don’t know. I hope so. We have to wait for people to return to normal life. And when it does, wait to see how the virus evolves.”