Prince William and wife Kate leave Pakistan, day after aborted flight

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Britain's Prince William and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, depart from Lahore airport, Pakistan October 18, 2019. (Reuters)
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Britain’s Duke and Duchess of Cambridge play with golden labrador puppies as they visit an Army Canine Centre in Islamabad, Pakistan October 18, 2019. (Reuters)
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Britain's Prince William and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge smile as they visit an Army Canine Centre, where Britain provides support to a programme that trains dogs to identify explosive devices, in Islamabad, Pakistan October 18, 2019. (Reuters)
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Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, walk with golden labrador puppies Salto and Sky as they visit an Army Canine Centre, where Britain provides support to a programme that trains dogs to identify explosive devices, in Islamabad, Pakistan October 18, 2019. (Reuters)
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Britain's Prince William and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, depart from Lahore airport, Pakistan October 18, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 18 October 2019

Prince William and wife Kate leave Pakistan, day after aborted flight

  • A planned trip to the famed Khyber Pass — one of the two major border crossings in to Afghanistan — was called off after the flight drama
  • Britain’s Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have spent their tour promoting causes such as girls’ education and conservation

ISLAMABAD: Britain's Prince William and his wife Kate left Pakistan on Friday after visiting an army dog training school, a day after a severe thunderstorm forced them to change their schedule and stay the night in Lahore.
A planned visit to a Pakistani military post in the Khyber region on Friday morning was cancelled because of the change in their schedule, but the prince said learning about the security situation in the country was an objective of the visit.
"What happens here in Pakistan directly correlates to what happens on the streets of the UK," William told British media after he and Kate saw dogs that are trained to sniff out explosives.
"We are involved with the Pakistanis for a very good reason, it will actually keep people safe back in the UK."
An RAF Voyager carrying the royals aborted landings in Islamabad and nearby Rawalpindi on Thursday because of severe turbulence during the thunderstorm.
The couple stayed at Lahore's Pearl Continental Hotel on Thursday evening, along with journalists, their staff and foreign ministry officials. The couple told reporters after returning to Lahore that they were "fine".
William and Kate have also highlighted education and the impact of climate change during their stay in Pakistan.
Pakistan's government hopes the couple's four-day visit will help boost the country's image as a tourist and business destination, after decades of sectarian violence and political unrest.
On Friday, a global money-laundering watchdog gave Pakistan until February to improve its counter-terror financing operations in line with an internationally agreed action plan, or face action.
"In terms of Pakistan's positive international image, the visit has been an unmitigated success," said Rifat Hussain, analyst and a former professor at Quaid e Azam university in Islamabad, though he said there had been some complaints from Pakistanis about the huge security operation around the trip. 


Malaysia arrests 680 Chinese nationals during online scam syndicate bust

Updated 20 min 11 sec ago

Malaysia arrests 680 Chinese nationals during online scam syndicate bust

  • Immigration officers track escaped suspects, seize thousands of electronic devices after huge sting operation
  • Operators would send a code to certain websites in mandarin and scam their victims’ money through WeChat services and banks in China

KUALA LUMPUR: At least 680 Chinese nationals have been arrested and hundreds more are being tracked down after Malaysian immigration authorities busted an online scam syndicate.

Around 150 immigration officers on Wednesday launched an early morning raid on sixth-floor office premises in the town of Cyberjaya, in Selangor, as part of a carefully planned sting operation.

Immigration director general, Khairul Dzaimee Daud, told Arab News that investigations were still underway into the alleged scamming activities of the 603 men and 77 women, aged between 19 and 35, arrested during the bust.

The scam is believed to have targeted Chinese citizens by offering fast profits in return for investments through the popular social media platform WeChat Pay.

Working from the syndicate’s Cyberjaya base, operators would send a code to certain websites in mandarin and scam their victims’ money through WeChat services and banks in China.

Following tip-offs from members of the public, Malaysian authorities conducted a month-long surveillance of the building before mounting the raid during which officers seized thousands of items of electronic equipment, including 8,230 handphones, 787 computers and 174 laptops.

Daud said on Thursday that those arrested had violated Malaysia’s immigration laws by entering the country on social visit passes with some overstaying their visa time limits.

“All of the Chinese nationals could not produce their passports or travel documents after being arrested, and no representative could produce valid documents on behalf of them,” the immigration chief added.

A number of immigration officers required treatment for injuries after scuffles broke out during the bust, and up to 150 Chinese nationals are thought to have escaped from the building.

Aerial videos showing suspects jumping from windows and fleeing the building quickly went viral on social media.

“The immigration department will continue to be on the lookout for individuals involved in the scam activities and is working closely with the Malaysian central bank and the police,” added Daud.