Prince William and wife Kate leave Pakistan, day after aborted flight

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Britain's Prince William and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, depart from Lahore airport, Pakistan October 18, 2019. (Reuters)
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Britain’s Duke and Duchess of Cambridge play with golden labrador puppies as they visit an Army Canine Centre in Islamabad, Pakistan October 18, 2019. (Reuters)
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Britain's Prince William and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge smile as they visit an Army Canine Centre, where Britain provides support to a programme that trains dogs to identify explosive devices, in Islamabad, Pakistan October 18, 2019. (Reuters)
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Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, walk with golden labrador puppies Salto and Sky as they visit an Army Canine Centre, where Britain provides support to a programme that trains dogs to identify explosive devices, in Islamabad, Pakistan October 18, 2019. (Reuters)
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Britain's Prince William and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, depart from Lahore airport, Pakistan October 18, 2019. (Reuters)
Updated 18 October 2019

Prince William and wife Kate leave Pakistan, day after aborted flight

  • A planned trip to the famed Khyber Pass — one of the two major border crossings in to Afghanistan — was called off after the flight drama
  • Britain’s Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have spent their tour promoting causes such as girls’ education and conservation

ISLAMABAD: Britain's Prince William and his wife Kate left Pakistan on Friday after visiting an army dog training school, a day after a severe thunderstorm forced them to change their schedule and stay the night in Lahore.
A planned visit to a Pakistani military post in the Khyber region on Friday morning was cancelled because of the change in their schedule, but the prince said learning about the security situation in the country was an objective of the visit.
"What happens here in Pakistan directly correlates to what happens on the streets of the UK," William told British media after he and Kate saw dogs that are trained to sniff out explosives.
"We are involved with the Pakistanis for a very good reason, it will actually keep people safe back in the UK."
An RAF Voyager carrying the royals aborted landings in Islamabad and nearby Rawalpindi on Thursday because of severe turbulence during the thunderstorm.
The couple stayed at Lahore's Pearl Continental Hotel on Thursday evening, along with journalists, their staff and foreign ministry officials. The couple told reporters after returning to Lahore that they were "fine".
William and Kate have also highlighted education and the impact of climate change during their stay in Pakistan.
Pakistan's government hopes the couple's four-day visit will help boost the country's image as a tourist and business destination, after decades of sectarian violence and political unrest.
On Friday, a global money-laundering watchdog gave Pakistan until February to improve its counter-terror financing operations in line with an internationally agreed action plan, or face action.
"In terms of Pakistan's positive international image, the visit has been an unmitigated success," said Rifat Hussain, analyst and a former professor at Quaid e Azam university in Islamabad, though he said there had been some complaints from Pakistanis about the huge security operation around the trip. 


Protests in New Delhi against India’s citizenship law ahead of Trump visit

Updated 33 min 20 sec ago

Protests in New Delhi against India’s citizenship law ahead of Trump visit

  • Hundreds of people supporting the new law clashed with those opposing it
  • The protest comes just a day before US President Donald Trump begins a two-day visit to India

NEW DELHI: Police used tear gas to disperse large crowds in India’s capital of New Delhi on Sunday in the latest eruption of violence at protests over a new citizenship law, police officials said.
Hundreds of people supporting the new law clashed with those opposing it, with the two groups pelting each other with stones in the Maujpur area in the northeastern part of the city, according to television footage.
“There must be some miscreants who want to spoil the peace in the area. We will identify them and take action against them,” Alok Kumar, a senior Delhi police official, told reporters about the protest.
“The situation is under control now,” he added.
The protest comes just a day before US President Donald Trump begins a two-day visit to India, where he is expected to raise the issue of religious freedom in the country with Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
India’s Citizenship Amendment Act, which eases the path for non-Muslims from neighboring Muslim-majority nations to gain citizenship, has triggered weeks of sometimes violent protests against Modi’s government.
The Indian law is seen by opponents as discriminating against Muslims and has deepened concerns that Modi’s administration is undermining India’s secular traditions.
Modi’s ruling Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party denies any bias against the country’s 180 million Muslims.
On Sunday, a separate protest also erupted in the northern Indian city of Aligarh, where protesters threw stones at the police, state administration official Chandra Bhushan Singh said.
The Internet in the area had been suspended until midnight, he added.