Prince Harry admits he and Prince William ‘on different paths’

Britain’s Prince Harry said he and his brother Prince William were on “different paths” and admitted occasional tension in their relationship. (File/AFP)
Updated 21 October 2019

Prince Harry admits he and Prince William ‘on different paths’

  • Harry said: “We are brothers. We will always be brothers”
  • This year the brothers split their joint offices and charitable foundation and no longer live in close proximity

LONDON: Britain’s Prince Harry said he and his brother Prince William were on “different paths” and admitted occasional tension in their relationship.
The Duke of Sussex, 35, has been plagued by rumors of a growing rift between him and 37-year-old William, and he acknowledged that “inevitably stuff happens” given their high-profile roles in the royal family.
In an interview with ITV television filmed during his recent tour of southern Africa with his wife Meghan, Harry said: “We are brothers. We will always be brothers.
“We are certainly on different paths at the moment but I will always be there for him as I know he will always be there for me.
“We don’t see each other as much as we used to because we are so busy but I love him dearly.
“The majority of the stuff is created out of nothing but as brothers, you know, you have good days, you have bad days.”
William and Harry’s close bond was cemented in the aftermath of their mother Diana, princess of Wales’s shock death aged 36 in a 1997 Paris car crash during a paparazzi pursuit.
But while William is one day destined for the throne, Harry — sixth in line and now with his own wife and baby — has begun to strike out on his own.
This year the brothers split their joint offices and charitable foundation and no longer live in close proximity.
Harry and Meghan married in May 2018 and their son Archie Mountbatten-Windsor was born in May this year.
Meghan, who has also been rumored to have feuded with William’s wife Kate, said her British friends had warned her not to marry Harry.
“The British tabloids will destroy your life,” she said they told her.
Former US actress Meghan, 38, has faced an increasingly hostile press, with the tabloids luxuriating in stories about her fractured family and rumored palace rifts.
The couple launched legal action this month against British tabloid The Mail on Sunday for alleged invasion of privacy over a letter to her father. It came with a stinging statement from Harry about general tabloid coverage.
Harry is also suing two newspaper groups over alleged voicemail interception, or phone hacking.
Asked if Meghan was facing the same media pressures as Diana, Harry replied: “I have a family to protect.
“I will not be bullied into playing a game that killed my mum.”
Meghan said she had tried to adopt a British “stiff upper lip” but thinks it is internally “really damaging.”
“It’s not enough to just survive something, that’s not the point of life. You have got to thrive.”
Asked if she was “not really OK” and life had “really been a struggle,” she replied simply: “Yes.”
Meanwhile Harry, who has been open about his own past mental health struggles emanating from Diana’s death, said: “It’s constant management. I thought I was out of the woods, and then suddenly it all came back.”
The couple are going to take six weeks off work.
During the interview, Harry said that he would like to live in Africa but finding the right place would be difficult.
His grandmother Queen Elizabeth II is the head of the Commonwealth and made Harry her youth ambassador for the 53-country grouping, which includes 19 African states.
“The rest of our lives’ work will be predominantly focused on Africa, on conservation,” said Harry.
“I don’t know where we could live in Africa at the moment.
“We have just come from Cape Town — that would be an amazing place to be able to base ourselves, of course it would, but with all the problems that are going on there, I just don’t see how we would be able to really make as much difference as we want to.”


Patten says China pursuing ‘Orwellian’ agenda in Hong Kong

Updated 36 min 57 sec ago

Patten says China pursuing ‘Orwellian’ agenda in Hong Kong

  • Chris Patten defended London’s announcement that it would grant residency and a path to citizenship for nearly 3 million Hong Kong residents
  • China shocked many of Hong Kong’s 7.5 million people when it announced earlier this month that it will enact a national security law for the city

BEIJING: The last British governor of Hong Kong criticized the Chinese government on Friday over proposed national security legislation, calling it part of an “Orwellian” drive to eliminate opposition in violation of the agreement on handing the territory over to Beijing.
Chris Patten defended London’s announcement that it would grant residency and a path to citizenship for nearly 3 million Hong Kong residents if Beijing goes through with passage of the legislation.
The law is seen as potentially imposing severe restrictions on freedom of speech and opposition political activity in the former British colony that was handed over to Chinese rule in 1997. China has denounced the offer of citizenship as a violation of its sovereignty.
“If they’ve broken the (Sino-British) Joint Declaration, if they’ve thrown it overboard, how can they then use the joint declaration as though it stops us doing something that’s a sovereign right of ours?” said Patten, now chancellor of the University of Oxford, in an online talk with reporters.
The declaration is a bilateral treaty signed as part of the handover process. China has essentially declared it null and void, while Britain says Beijing is reneging on its commitments made in the document that was supposed to be remain in effect until 2047.
China shocked many of Hong Kong’s 7.5 million people when it announced earlier this month that it will enact a national security law for the city, which was promised a high level of autonomy outside of foreign and defense affairs.
An earlier push to pass security legislation was shelved after massive Hong Kong street protests against it in 2003. However, Beijing appeared to lose patience after months of sometimes violent anti-government protests in Hong Kong last year that China said was an attempt to split the territory off from the rest of the country.
Patten said the security legislation is unnecessary because Hong Kong’s legal code already includes provisions to combat terrorism, financial crimes and other threats to security.
“What Beijing wants is something which deals with those rather worrying Orwellian crimes like sedition, whatever that may be,” Patten said.
China may also be seeking grounds to disqualify opposition candidates from running in September’s election for the local legislature by accusing them of being disloyal, he said.
Beijing has ignored promises that Hong Kong could democratize of its own accord after the handover, Patten said. The US should unite with other democratic countries to oppose underhanded tactics by Beijing, he said.
“It’s the Chinese Communist Party which attacks us, which hectors, which bullies, which tells companies which have roots in our countries, that unless they do what China wants, they won’t get any business in China,” Patten said. “That’s the way the Mafia behave, and the rest of the world shouldn’t put up with it, because if we do, liberal democracies are going to be screwed.”