Trump says Baghdadi successor killed by US troops

A screen grab allegedly showing former Daesh spokesman Abu Al-Hassan Al-MuHajjir. (Screen grab: YouTube)
Updated 29 October 2019

Trump says Baghdadi successor killed by US troops

  • Donald Trump: Just confirmed that Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi’s number one replacement has been terminated by American troops
  • Trump did not specify who he was referring to, but the United States confirmed the killing of Abu Al-Hassan Al-MuHajjir, Daesh spokesman and a high-ranking figure within the extremist group

WASHINGTON: President Donald Trump said on Tuesday the US military had killed the person who likely would have succeeded Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi as the leader of Daesh.
“Just confirmed that Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi’s number one replacement has been terminated by American troops,” Trump wrote on Twitter. “Most likely would have taken the top spot.”
Trump did not specify who he was referring to, but the United States on Monday confirmed the killing of Abu Al-Hassan Al-MuHajjir, Daesh spokesman and a high-ranking figure within the extremist group.

Trump on Sunday announced the killing of Baghdadi by US special operations forces in northwestern Syria.
A senior State Department official said on Monday that Al-MuHajjir was killed in a separate operation. The Syrian Kurdish YPG militia said on Sunday that Al-MuHajjir was killed in a joint raid between Kurdish-led and US forces in northern Syria.


Protesters regain control of third bridge in Baghdad

Updated 17 November 2019

Protesters regain control of third bridge in Baghdad

  • Security forces used tear gas and stun bombs to prevent protesters from getting right across Ahrar Bridge in central Baghdad
  • More than 300 people have been killed since the start of mass unrest in Baghdad

BAGHDAD: Iraqi protesters regained control of a third bridge leading to Baghdad’s Green Zone on Sunday, taking further ground in the biggest wave of anti-government demonstrations in decades.
Security forces used tear gas and stun bombs to prevent protesters from getting right across Ahrar Bridge in central Baghdad, part of a weeks-long attempt to disrupt traffic and reach the Green Zone housing government ministry and embassies.
Protesters made a barricade of old cabinets, trash cans and metal sheeting on the bridge while security forces took positions behind blast walls installed to prevent protesters from crossing to the other side. Protesters who choked on the tear gas were evacuated by tuk-tuk, a Reuters cameraman said.
On Saturday, Iraqi demonstrators reoccupied part of adjacent Sinak Bridge and a nearby tall building in Baghdad that security forces had pushed them away from a week before. They have held a third bridge, Jamhuriya, since October 25.
More than 300 people have been killed since the start of mass unrest in Baghdad and southern Iraq in early October, the largest demonstrations since the fall of Saddam Hussein in 2003.
Protesters are demanding the overthrow of a political class seen as corrupt and beholden to foreign interests.
In Basra in the south, dozens of protesters burned tires and briefly blocked some roads on Sunday, before police managed to restore control and reopen them, police said.
The unrest has shattered the relative calm that followed the defeat of Islamic State in 2017.