Saudi fashion house Sadeem hits the runway in Dubai

Luxury is at the core of all Sadeem designs, so silk was a natural first choice of fabric. (Supplied)
Updated 01 November 2019

Saudi fashion house Sadeem hits the runway in Dubai

DUBAI: Saudi designer Aljawharah Sadeem Abdulaziz Alshehai seems to live by Coco Chanel’s ethos: “Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.”

The young fashion designer is behind the sustainable label, Sadeem, whose current collection is called Abwaab (Doors). “It is inspired by a nation moving forward without letting go of the past. Saudi Arabia has been exploring many of its untapped resources, with a very determined plan,” she said.

Her collection will take to the runway this Friday evening at Fashion Forward Dubai (FFWD).




The young designer's current collection is called Abwaab. (Supplied)

Luxury is at the core of all Sadeem designs, so silk was a natural first choice of fabric. “This fabric is luxurious and delicate and a natural fiber. Silk is also durable and biodegradable and I only work with textile mills that are eco-friendly,” she said.

This designer does not believe in following trends. “When the item is no longer desired, I hope that it would be swapped or handed to a friend, a second-hand shop or donated to charity,” she said.

These are investment buys. With many of her motifs referenced from the native folklore, architecture, costumes and jewelry of Saudi Arabia, her fashion is about marrying Arab heritage with contemporary design. “The geometric shapes and triangles are dominant, and reflect the design aesthetic of our heritage.”




Her collection will take to the runway this Friday evening at Fashion Forward Dubai. (Supplied)

These clothes are for the modern Arab woman but also have international appeal. They are made between New York’s garment district, Dubai Design District and her studio in Riyadh.

“I dream of creating a fashion foundation that would help to launch emerging young talents within the MENA region,” she said. “The focus would be on preserving traditional, artisanal and handcrafted work. I hope to achieve a strong network of creative thinkers and to work with communities that practice strategic solutions toward sustainable shared goals.”

It is fashion labels such as Sadeem that look set to take the story of Arab fashion global.


Photographers reveal Egypt’s hidden gems in show for a good cause

This is the group’s fourth charitable exhibition. (Supplied)
Updated 21 November 2019

Photographers reveal Egypt’s hidden gems in show for a good cause

  • Cairo Saturday Walks are a group of photographers who go on adventures every week to take pictures across the city
  • The team is now exhibiting its work for charity at a gallery in the city

DUBAI: The Cairo Saturday Walks team, a group of photographers who go on adventures every week to take pictures across the city, are now exhibiting their work for charity at a gallery in the city.

The exhibition brought together more than 50 local, international, professional and amateur photographers who are displaying their work in the Maadi district until Nov. 22.

The youngest participant is 13 and the oldest is 60. (Supplied)

All proceeds from the gallery will go to the restoration of a public facility in one of the underserved areas that the group has walked in and photographed during the past, according to the founder of Cairo Saturday Walks Karim El-Hayawan.

This is the group’s fourth charitable exhibition.

El-Hayawan described the practice as an “organic experience,” during which photographers discover the city’s hidden gems.

The group is displaying its work in the Maadi district until Nov. 22. (Supplied)

What started off as a one-man weekly walk is now a practice shared by 500 photographers.

El-Hayawan’s journey began after he took a basic introductory course in photography. “I did not have time during the week to work on my photography assignments. I used to go out every Saturday to take pictures and I used to post on my account. Then a lot of people started asking me ‘Where are these places? Where do you go? We want to join,’ although (these places) exist 10-15 minutes from anywhere in Cairo, but people did not notice them or had forgotten them,” he told Arab News.

The photographers walk around and discover the city’s hidden gems. (Supplied)

The group has a library of more than 15,000 pictures accessible on Instagram through #cairosaturdaywalks.

“We ask people who join us to share their pictures on that hashtag, with the intention of having a long-term documentation of Cairo,” El-Hayawan said. “Everyone takes pictures from his/her own perspective. It is extremely neutral; everyone takes pictures of whatever they want.”

In two to three years, people can go back to this documentation and see that Cairo looked this way at this time,” he said.

All proceeds from the gallery will go to the restoration of a public facility in one of the underserved areas that the group has walked in and photographed during the past. (Supplied)

A typical Saturday for the photographers starts off at a cafe. “We meet in the morning at a coffee shop and we take a little bus that we rent every Saturday and we just hit the road to somewhere random and we get lost. We call them to pick us up from wherever we reach at the end of the day. The idea is that it has no structure and I really aimed at that from the very beginning,” El-Hayawan said.

What started off as a one-man weekly walk is now a practice shared by 500 photographers. (Supplied)

The youngest participant is 13 and the oldest is 60, but El-Hayawan said that anyone can join the walk and share their pictures.

“I found out about Cairo Saturday Walks from Instagram. The spirit of people I walk with is just amazing. Also, the fact that I am Egyptian yet I still get amazed by Cairo’s streets is what pushes me to explore more every week,” Yara Wael, a 17-year-old photographer, told Arab News.