Saudi fashion house Sadeem hits the runway in Dubai

Luxury is at the core of all Sadeem designs, so silk was a natural first choice of fabric. (Supplied)
Updated 01 November 2019

Saudi fashion house Sadeem hits the runway in Dubai

DUBAI: Saudi designer Aljawharah Sadeem Abdulaziz Alshehai seems to live by Coco Chanel’s ethos: “Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.”

The young fashion designer is behind the sustainable label, Sadeem, whose current collection is called Abwaab (Doors). “It is inspired by a nation moving forward without letting go of the past. Saudi Arabia has been exploring many of its untapped resources, with a very determined plan,” she said.

Her collection will take to the runway this Friday evening at Fashion Forward Dubai (FFWD).




The young designer's current collection is called Abwaab. (Supplied)

Luxury is at the core of all Sadeem designs, so silk was a natural first choice of fabric. “This fabric is luxurious and delicate and a natural fiber. Silk is also durable and biodegradable and I only work with textile mills that are eco-friendly,” she said.

This designer does not believe in following trends. “When the item is no longer desired, I hope that it would be swapped or handed to a friend, a second-hand shop or donated to charity,” she said.

These are investment buys. With many of her motifs referenced from the native folklore, architecture, costumes and jewelry of Saudi Arabia, her fashion is about marrying Arab heritage with contemporary design. “The geometric shapes and triangles are dominant, and reflect the design aesthetic of our heritage.”




Her collection will take to the runway this Friday evening at Fashion Forward Dubai. (Supplied)

These clothes are for the modern Arab woman but also have international appeal. They are made between New York’s garment district, Dubai Design District and her studio in Riyadh.

“I dream of creating a fashion foundation that would help to launch emerging young talents within the MENA region,” she said. “The focus would be on preserving traditional, artisanal and handcrafted work. I hope to achieve a strong network of creative thinkers and to work with communities that practice strategic solutions toward sustainable shared goals.”

It is fashion labels such as Sadeem that look set to take the story of Arab fashion global.


Virus forces Belgium’s Tomorrowland dance festival online

Festival co-founder Michiel Beers said they hoped to capture the spirit of the event while “re-inventing the festival experience.” (AFP)
Updated 9 min 59 sec ago

Virus forces Belgium’s Tomorrowland dance festival online

BRUSSELS: Belgium’s Tomorrowland festival, one of the world’s biggest electronic music events, will be held online this year because of coronavirus restrictions, organizers said Thursday.

While Belgium is slowly lifting the lockdown imposed to curb the spread of COVID-19, music festivals are banned until at least the end of August.

Tomorrowland, which usually draws some 400,000 people to the small town of Boom, will this year take the form of a two-day “digital music festival experience.” 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Happy Birthday @dimitrivegas. Make it epic!

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Revellers will be able to navigate eight different “stages” through a computer, smartphone or tablet, with organizers promising “the planet’s biggest names in electronic dance music and the world’s best technology in 3D design, video production and special effects.”

Weekend tickets for Tomorrowland Around the World on July 25 to 26 cost 20 euros.

Festival co-founder Michiel Beers said they hoped to capture the spirit of the event while “re-inventing the festival experience.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Light up the sky and dream of tomorrow...

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“We hope that hundreds of thousands of people will unite in a responsible way and that small Tomorrowland gatherings at people’s homes – from Canada to Australia, from Japan to Brazil and everywhere in between – will be organized,” he said in a statement.

“Especially during the weekend where normally Tomorrowland Belgium would take place, we really have the power to unite the world.”

It is not the only major event to be hit by coronavirus – Britain’s Glastonbury festival was forced to cancel the 50th anniversary edition.