Jorja Smith glows in Zuhair Murad gown

Updated 04 November 2019

Jorja Smith glows in Zuhair Murad gown

  • The gown is among a lineup of show-stopping ensembles she’s donned in recent months
  • It's not the first time that the budding star has wore a Middle Eastern label

DUBAI: Last week, singer Jorja Smith hit the streets of London wearing a sunshine yellow taffeta dress from Zuhair Murad’s Spring 2020 ready-to-wear collection. The gown boasted an oversized bow in the back, plunging halter neckline and a high slit that served to show off her silver, strappy heels. The British crooner elevated the glamorous look with Chopard jewels.

When it came to her hair and makeup, the 22-year-old took a more minimal approach. She opted to rake her chestnut curls into a tight, face-framing ponytail. As for her makeup, Dior’s new global makeup ambassador stuck to her signature luminous complexion and nude pout.




The gown boasted an oversized bow in the back, plunging halter neckline and a high slit. (Getty)

She may have only recently emerged on the scene, but Smith is quickly cementing her status as a style star to watch out for. A red carpet fixture on the awards circuit, her princess-worthy evening gown by the Lebanese couturier is among a lineup of show-stopping ensembles she’s donned in recent months. In addition to the dramatic, beaded, custom Balmain gown she wore to this year’s Grammys, the popstar has also turned heads wearing a short, feather-trim 16Arlington gown to the BRIT Awards.

Her onstage looks are equally as striking. Whether she’s co-headlining a string of shows on tour with Bruno Mars or performing for fans at sold-out shows, the Grammy-nominated R&B star, with a little help from her longtime stylist Leah Abott, consistently puts her versatile and laidback style on display.

Meanwhile, it’s not the first time that the budding star has been spotted wearing a design by a Middle Eastern designer. In fact, the “Teenage Fantasy” hitmaker is a loyal fan of Atelier Mundane, a London-based label co-founded by Iraqi sisters Zahra and Sarah Asmail and their partner Giorgio Lieuw-On. The singer has donned the label’s wrap dress, corset and the keffiyeh-patterned Freedom Suit in the past.

She is also a fan of Jordanian-Romanian footwear designer Amina Muaddi, sporting the label’s perennially sold-out cult heels on various occasions.


Archaeologists unveil possible shrine to Rome’s first king

Updated 21 February 2020

Archaeologists unveil possible shrine to Rome’s first king

  • Possible shrine to Romulus is found at the heart of Rome, on the site of the old Roman forum
  • The founder of Rome was abandoned by the banks of the river Tiber, before being nursed back to health by a she-wolf

ROME: Archaeologists said on Friday they had discovered an ancient cenotaph that almost certainly commemorated the legendary founder of Rome, Romulus, buried in the heart of the Italian capital.
The small chamber containing a simple sarcophagus and round stone block was originally found at the start of the last century beneath the Capitoline Hill inside the old Roman forum.
However, officials say the significance of the find has only just become clear following fresh excavations and new research.
Alfonsina Russo, the head of the Colosseum Archaeological Park, said the site probably dated back to the sixth century BC, and was located in the most ancient part of the city which was directly linked in historical texts to Rome’s first king.
“This area is highly symbolic. This surely cannot be Romulus’ tomb, but it is a place of memory, a cenotaph,” Russo told Reuters TV.
The shrine is buried beneath the entrance to the Curia, one of the meeting places for Roman senators which was subsequently converted into a church — a move that protected it from being dismantled for its stones as happened to other forum buildings.

The underground chamber was also located close to the “Lapis Niger,” an antique slab of marble that was venerated by Romans and covered a stone column that was dedicated to “the King” and appeared to curse anyone who thought to disturb it.
Russo said the Roman poet Horace and ancient Roman historian Marcus Terentius Varro had related that Romulus was buried behind the “rostra” — a tribune where speakers addressed the crowd in the forum. “The rostra are right here,” she said.
No body was found in the sarcophagus, which was made of volcanic tuff rock, but according to at least one legend, Romulus vanished into the sky following his death to become the God Quirinus, meaning that possibly he never had a tomb.
According to the myth, Romulus and his brother Remus, the sons of the god Mars, were abandoned by the banks of the river Tiber where a she-wolf found them and fed them with her milk.
The brothers are said to have founded Rome at the site in 753 BC and ended up fighting over who should be in charge. Romulus killed Remus.