Exiled Cambodian opposition figurehead arrives in Malaysia

Cambodia’s opposition figurehead Sam Rainsy has lived in France since 2015 to avoid jail for convictions he says are politically motivated. (AP)
Updated 09 November 2019

Exiled Cambodian opposition figurehead arrives in Malaysia

  • Sam Rainsy has lived in France since 2015 to avoid jail for convictions he says are politically motivated
  • Dozens of activists have been rounded up in recent weeks in Cambodia

KUALA LUMPUR: Cambodia’s exiled opposition figurehead Sam Rainsy arrived in Malaysia Saturday as he sought to return home to rally his supporters against strongman Hun Sen, while security was beefed up at the kingdom’s borders and in Phnom Penh.
Rainsy, who has lived in France since 2015 to avoid jail for convictions he says are politically motivated, has long promised a dramatic return on November 9, Cambodia’s Independence Day.
But Hun Sen, who has ruled Cambodia since 1985, has vowed to bar him and other exiled figures from his party — which was outlawed ahead of much-criticized elections last year.
Dozens of activists have been rounded up in recent weeks in Cambodia while the authoritarian leader has called on neighboring countries to help thwart the opposition’s attempts to return for what he has described as an attempted coup.
After being barred in Paris Thursday from getting on a flight to Thailand, Rainsy boarded a plane a day later and arrived at the main airport serving the Malaysian capital Kuala Lumpur.
A beaming Rainsy told his supporters to “keep up the hope” as he arrived, and that he was determined to get home.
“We are on the right track,” Rainsy, a founder of the Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP), told reporters at the airport.
“Democracy has prevailed in Malaysia, democracy will prevail in Cambodia.”
Malaysians ejected a corruption-plagued government that had ruled the country for over six decades in a historic election last year, and voted in a more reform-minded alliance.
The former finance minister and arch-rival to Hun Sen hopes his backers — including among the armed forces — can unite to topple the government and restore democracy to the poor Southeast Asian nation.
Still, the likelihood of him making it back to Cambodia appears slim. Neighboring Thailand’s premier has indicated he will not let Rainsy transit through the kingdom and observers believe he will first need to secure a deal with Hun Sen.
The strongman was not taking any chances, however.
In the Cambodian capital Phnom Penh, dozens of riot police were deployed while army trucks lined the main road to the international airport.
Security was also ramped up at Thai-Cambodia border city of Poipet — seen as the most likely crossing point for Rainsy and other opposition figures if they try to come by land — with roads barricaded and lines of armed police standing guard.
Deputy of the now-dissolved CNRP, Mu Sochua, was also detained when she arrived in Malaysia this week following a request from Cambodian authorities but was released after less than 24 hours.
Malaysian authorities have indicated they will not forcibly deport her to Cambodia but she has until next week to leave the country.
The CNRP had been viewed as Cambodia’s only serious opposition before it was dissolved by a court in 2017 ahead of elections the following year.
That paved the way for the ruling Cambodia People’s Party to win all 125 parliamentary seats, turning the country into a one-party state.


Taliban say prisoner swap promised by Kabul fails to happen

Updated 21 min 25 sec ago

Taliban say prisoner swap promised by Kabul fails to happen

  • The three Taliban prisoners included Anas Haqqani, the younger brother of the Taliban’s deputy chief Sirajuddin Haqqani, who leads the fearsome Haqqani militant network
  • They were to be exchanged for American University of Afghanistan professors, American Kevin King and Australian Timothy Weeks

ISLAMABAD: Three Taliban prisoners who were to be freed in exchange for an American and an Australian national, both kidnapped in 2016, are still in custody in Bagram prison, north of the capital Kabul, Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said Friday.
The three Taliban prisoners did not show up at an exchange site that had been agreed upon with the US, though Afghan President Ashraf Ghani said they would be freed.
Mujahid had no explanation for the no-show.
The three Taliban prisoners included Anas Haqqani, the younger brother of the Taliban’s deputy chief Sirajuddin Haqqani, who leads the fearsome Haqqani militant network. They were to be exchanged for American University of Afghanistan professors, American Kevin King and Australian Timothy Weeks.
Mujahid said the professors are still in Taliban custody.
In a televised address to the nation on Wednesday, Ghani said the “conditional release” was a very hard decision to make.
Prisoner releases were a key point during peace talks between the US and Taliban last year. US President Donald Trump abruptly ended the talks in September, following a spate of violent attacks in Kabul that killed more than a dozen people, including a US soldier.
The prisoner exchange was seen as a possible door to restarting the talks. US peace envoy Zalmay Khalilzad has crisscrossed the region in recent weeks meeting with Washington’s NATO allies, as well as Russia, China, Pakistan and Afghanistan.
President Ghani has repeatedly demanded his government be included in talks with the Taliban, who have refused saying the Afghan government is an American puppet.
Ghani is now in the middle of a controversial contest for his job as president following Afghanistan’s Sept. 28 elections, which drew allegations of widespread misconduct and fraud.
Preliminary results were supposed to be released on Thursday, but have once again been postponed.
Ghani had hoped a big win in the presidential polls would solidify his political position, but the recount of ballots has been challenged by his main rival, Abdullah Abdullah, who shares power in Afghanistan’s coalition government.
That government was cobbled together after the 2014 presidential elections, which were so deeply overwhelmed by allegations of fraud that the United States stepped in to broker a power sharing agreement between Abdullah and Ghani.