Resolution of Kashmir conflict imperative for regional prosperity: Pakistan PM

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Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan delivers his address during the inauguration ceremony of Gurdwara Darbar Sahib in Kartarpur, Pakistan, on Nov. 9, 2019. (AP Photo/K.M. Chaudary)
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Updated 09 November 2019

Resolution of Kashmir conflict imperative for regional prosperity: Pakistan PM

  • Says India and Pakistan can co-exist in peace, just like Germany and France
  • He was speaking at the inaugural ceremony of the Kartarpur Corridor

KARTARPUR, Pakistan / NEW DELHI: Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan on Saturday linked the prosperity of the South Asian region to resolving the Kashmir conflict, insisting that both Pakistan and India could coexist in peace, like Germany and France, if they succeeded in ending the 72-year-old border issue.

He was speaking at the inaugural ceremony of the Kartarpur Corridor at the Katarpur Sahib Gurdawar, nearly 4 km from the Indian border point that divides the two countries.

“I welcome you all and first of all congratulate the Sikh community all over the world on the 550th birthday of their Guru Nanak. Pakistan has completed an uphill task of completing the project in a mere 10 months. I never knew that we can do this in such short time. It means that we could do more work,” he said, adding that the message of Guru Nanak was to propagate love instead of hate, urging Sikhs to continue with the cause.

He added that the only way for Pakistan and India to be good neighbors, make progress and uplift the lives of their countrymen was by resolving the Kashmir issue.

“I attended a conference in India headed by Manmohan Singh, then prime minister, where he said that ‘all of South Asia can rise if we solve Kashmir.’ And that is what I told Modi. 

This is the biggest and happiest day for the Sikh community.

Manmohan Singh, Former prime minister of India

“Unfortunately, Kashmir has gone beyond a territorial issue. This is an issue of humanity, not a territorial dispute and I am sad about it.

“When this problem is solved and Kashmiris get their rights, the subcontinent will see prosperity and our entire region will rise in the world, and I pray that day is not far,” he said, ending his speech with a question: “If France and Germany can live together, do business and open borders after many wars, why don’t we?”




Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan speaks after inaugurating the ceremony at the Shrine of Baba Guru Nanak Dev at Gurdwara Darbar Sahib in Kartarpur, near the Indian border, on November 9, 2019. (AFP / AAMIR QURESHI)

On the other side of the border, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi thanked Khan for facilitating the Kartarpur project.

“I thank Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan. He understood India’s feelings on the Kartarpur Corridor issue, gave respect and, keeping in view those feelings, worked accordingly,” Modi said at the opening of the Kartarpur project at Dera Baba Nanak in Gurdaspur district of India’s Panjab.

He flagged off the first group of 550 pilgrims visiting Kartarpur at the inauguration of the corridor.

The Kartarpur Corridor connects Dera Baba Nanak (the birth place of Sikh’s first saint Guru Nanak) in India’s Panjab with Darbar Sahib gurdwara (Nanak’s resting place) in Kartarpur, Pakistan. The Sikh Guru spent his last 18 years in Kartarpur.

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Hackers attempt to take down UK Labour Party’s web services ahead of election

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Hackers attempt to take down UK Labour Party’s web services ahead of election

  • Britain’s security agencies have warned that Russia and other countries could use cyberattacks messages on social media to attempt to disrupt the election
  • The nature of such attacks often made it difficult to attribute responsibility to any particular group, a NCSC spokesman said

LONDON: Hackers attacked Britain’s opposition Labour Party, bombarding its web services with malicious traffic in an attempt to force them offline just weeks ahead of a national election, party and security officials said on Tuesday,
“We have experienced a sophisticated and large-scale cyberattack on Labour digital platforms,” Labour said in a statement. “We took swift action and these attempts failed due to our robust security systems.
The party was confident data breach occurred, it said.
Britain’s security agencies have warned that Russia and other countries could use cyberattacks or political messages on social media to attempt to disrupt the Dec. 12 election.
Moscow has repeatedly denied Western allegations of election interference and a person with knowledge of the matter said an initial investigation had found nothing to link the Labour Party attack to a foreign state.
Britain’s National Cyber Security Center, part of the GCHQ signals intelligence agency, said the attack was a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack — a technique used by hackers to take down websites by overwhelming them with malicious traffic.
“DDoS attacks are a common form of attack used by a very wide range of attackers. Mitigation techniques are available and worked in this case,” a NCSC spokesman said.
The nature of such attacks often made it difficult to attribute responsibility to any particular group, he said.
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said the attack was very serious but was successfully repelled by the party’s defense systems when the digital assault began on Monday.
“But if this is a sign of things to come in this election, I feel very nervous about it all,” he said. “Because a cyberattack against a political party in an election is suspicious and something one is very worried about.”
A Labour spokesman said that while the attack had slowed down some campaign activity, they were restored on Tuesday.
The person with knowledge of the matter said any Labour Party web services currently offline were not directly connected to the attack.
Britain goes to the polls on Dec. 12 in an election called by Prime Minister Boris Johnson to try to break the Brexit deadlock in parliament more than three years since the country voted to leave the European Union.
A report by parliament’s Intelligence and Security Committee has investigated Russian activity in British politics and reportedly includes charges of spying and interference in polls, including the 2016 Brexit referendum and the 2017 national election.
The government, however, has declined to publish it before the upcoming election.