Dubai property giant Emaar reports 20% bump in profits

A logo of Dubai's Emaar Properties is seen on a building in Dubai, United Arab Emirates January 12, 2018. (Reuters)
Updated 10 November 2019

Dubai property giant Emaar reports 20% bump in profits

  • Emaar reported that over the first nine months of the year net profits rose just 2.3 percent to $1.2 billion

DUBAI: Dubai construction and hospitality giant Emaar Properties on Sunday reported a rise in interim profit results, posting higher sales despite an economic downturn that has depressed the property industry.
The company, which owns the world’s tallest tower, Burj Khalifa, said it posted $362 million in net profit in the third quarter, up 20 percent from $302.4 million in the same period last year.
Dubai is defined by its beachfront skyscrapers and man-made islands, but it is stuck in a five-year property downturn with analysts saying there will be no relief in the near term.
The government in 2018 introduced a raft of rescue measures including easy visa terms for expatriate buyers and permanent residency permits for big investors. And in September, a top-level committee was established to rebalance the market.
Emaar, the largest property firm in the Middle East, reported that over the first nine months of the year net profits rose just 2.3 percent to $1.2 billion, from $1.18 billion in the corresponding period of 2018.
Sales in the first three quarters of 2019 hit $3.44 billion, a surge of 25 percent on the same period last year.
The growth was attributed to the “resilient performance of the property, malls and hospitality business,” the company said in a statement posted on the Dubai Financial Market website.
Since 2002, Emaar has delivered some 59,000 residential units in Dubai and other global markets.
Besides real estate, Emaar has a number of malls, including Dubai Mall, the world’s most visited shopping center, and several hotels.


Gulf economies to take coronavirus exports hit says S&P

Updated 17 February 2020

Gulf economies to take coronavirus exports hit says S&P

  • S&P expects oil prices to remain at $60 per barrel in 2020 and decline to $55 from 2021
  • The ratings agency expects the impact on the banking sector to be low, with little direct exposure to Chinese companies

LONDON: Gulf states already hurt by a weak oil price could reap further economic pain from the impact of the coronavirus on their exports, S&P Global Ratings warned on Monday.

The ratings agency believes there is a risk that the economic impact of the virus could increase unpredictably with implications for overall economic growth, the oil price and the creditworthiness of some companies. Still, its base case scenario anticipates a limited impact for now.

“Given the importance of the Chinese economy to global economic activity, S&P Global Ratings expects recent developments could weigh on growth prospects in the GCC, already affected by low oil prices and geopolitical uncertainty,” it said in a report.

Although the rate of spread and timing of the peak of the new coronavirus is still uncertain, S&P said that modeling by epidemiologists indicated a likely range for the peak of between late-February and June.

Notwithstanding the spread of the virus, S&P expects oil prices to remain at $60 per barrel in 2020 and decline to $55 from 2021.

It sees the biggest potential impact on regional economies to be felt in terms of export volumes. S&P estimates that GCC countries send between 4 percent and 45 percent of their exported goods to China, with Oman being the most exposed (45.1 percent) and the UAE the least exposed (4.2 percent).

Beyond the trade of goods, the Gulf’s hospitality sector could also feel the effect of reduced tourist arrivals with hotels and shopping malls likely to suffer. The impact could be further amplified because of the high-spending nature of Chinese tourists.

On-location spending by Chinese tourists is the fourth largest in the world at $3,064 per person, according to Nielsen data. About 1.4 million Chinese tourists visited the GCC in 2018 with expectations of that figure rising to 2.2 million in 2023, and with the UAE as the main destination.

Chinese passengers also accounted for 3.9 percent of passengers passing through Dubai International Airport in 2018.

S&P said that if the effect of the new coronavirus is felt beyond March, the number of visitors to Expo 2020 in Dubai could be lower than expected.

The ratings agency expects the impact on the banking sector to be low, with little direct exposure to Chinese companies.