Ancient cup given to 1st marathon victor returned to Greece

An ancient Greek drinking cup decorated with runners, which was one of the awards presented to Spyros Louis, the Greek winner of the Marathon in the 1896 first modern Olympic Games in Athens, is seen at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens on Nov. 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
Updated 14 November 2019

Ancient cup given to 1st marathon victor returned to Greece

ATHENS, Greece: An ancient Greek cup awarded as a prize to the marathon winner in the first modern Olympics of 1896 has been returned to Athens from a German university.
Greece’s Culture Ministry says the 6th century B.C. pottery vessel was considered lost for decades until research in 2014 by archaeologist Giorgos Kavvadias identified it in the University of Muenster’s collections.
A ministry statement says it was proved “beyond any doubt” that the two-handled cup painted with ancient runners was the one given to Spiros Louis, the Greek marathon victor in 1896.
Following correspondence with Greek officials, the university agreed to return the cup, which was part of a private German collection it had bought in 1986.
The vessel was presented at a ceremony Wednesday at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.


K9 COVID sniffers: UAE to use dogs to detect coronavirus

Updated 09 July 2020

K9 COVID sniffers: UAE to use dogs to detect coronavirus

  • The dogs sniffed samples from the armpits of suspected cases
  • The ministry said trained K9 detected the infection with a 92% success

DUBAI: UAE’s Ministry of Interior successfully completed trials that used K9 police dogs to detect coronavirus cases, state news agency WAM reported.

In the trial, dogs sniffed samples from the armpits of suspected cases, which according to the ministry, lead to immediate detection.

“Data and studies showed that detection of presumed COVID-19 cases achieved approximately 92 percent in overall accuracy,” the ministry said.

The US, Germany and UK are also training K9 dogs to detect the virus.

Trained dogs have previously been used to detect other diseases, including tuberculosis and malaria.