Fly with The Helicopter Company and experience the skies of Saudi Arabia

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The Helicopter Company is Saudi Arabia’s first and only private helicopter company. (Supplied)
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The Helicopter Company is Saudi Arabia’s first and only private helicopter company. (Supplied)
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The Helicopter Company is Saudi Arabia’s first and only private helicopter company. (Supplied)
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The Helicopter Company is Saudi Arabia’s first and only private helicopter company. (Supplied)
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The Helicopter Company is Saudi Arabia’s first and only private helicopter company. (Supplied)
Updated 24 November 2019

Fly with The Helicopter Company and experience the skies of Saudi Arabia

DUBAI: The Helicopter Company, Saudi Arabia’s first and only private helicopter company, aims to provide a faster travel option for residents, pilgrims and visitors to the Kingdom, especially those who want to see hard-to-reach sites that have been opened up for tourism.

“We started our operations in September … we started with VIP and officials’ trips,” CEO Yahya Al-Ghoraibi told Arab News on the sidelines of the biennial Dubai Airshow.

THC, fully owned by the Public Investment Fund, has already registered over 140 flights for customers.

Also in its services menu are private transport, emergency medical evacuations and tourism transfers. The company also works with hospitals and emergency services to provide support in areas in the Kingdom which are hard to reach by land, as well as providing flights for Hajj and Umrah pilgrimages.

Al-Ghoraibi is particularly proud of the company’s high level of engagement with Saudi employees, who comprise a majority of THC’s workforce.

“Currently, we have over 65 employees, 90 percent are Saudis,” Al-Ghoraibi said, adding the company’s aircraft technicians are all Saudi nationals while its pilots are almost all Saudis.

THC is also looking to engage more women by recruiting Saudi women pilots, Al-Ghoraibi said, especially that expansion plans are now on the table and may require the acquisition of more helicopters for its fleet.

“The services we are providing require that. Small helicopters, medium helicopters, big helicopters … (it) will depend on the trip requirements and the area,” Al-Ghoraibi said.

The company is also working to build more facilities and to increase its available on-ground helipads in the Kingdom, and also offer support to buildings and hotels working on their own helipads.


Aramco chief sees demand for oil staying above 100m barrels

Updated 23 January 2020

Aramco chief sees demand for oil staying above 100m barrels

  • A panel on the global energy outlook at the WEF in Davos heard that renewable energy alone would not be able to meet rising demand for power as more people moved into the middle class
  • The panel also heard that coal, not oil, remained the biggest source of carbon emissions

DAVOS: Aramco CEO Amin Nasser said he expected global oil demand to stay above the 100 million barrels threshold as the rise of the global middle class spurred demand for energy.
A panel on the global energy outlook at the World Economic Forum in Davos heard that renewable energy alone would not be able to meet rising demand for power as more people moved into the middle class.
“There will be additional demand and the only way to meet it is if you continue to provide affordable, reliable and viable energy to the rest of the world,” said the Aramco CEO.
“There is good penetration from renewables and electric cars are picking up however you need to consider what is happening in the world. There are still an additional 2 billion people coming. There are currently 3 billion people using biomass, animal dung, kerosene for cooking and there are 1 billion people today without electricity and almost 50 percent of people have never flown in an aeroplane.”
The panel heard that coal, not oil, remained the biggest source of carbon emissions but that the location of many coal-fired power plants in developing Asian economies meant that reducing its impact was a major challenge.
“The number one source of emissions by far is the coal fire power plants – they alone are responsible for one third of emissions,” said International Energy Agency Executive Director Fatih Birol. “But they are in many cases the number one source of electricity generation in low income countries - so this is not a black and white issue.”