Saudi driver Reema Juffali makes history as first woman to compete in Saudi Arabia

Reema Juffali made history on Friday by becoming the first Saudi Arabian female racer to drive competitively in the Kingdom. (Screenshot/ABB Formula E)
Updated 22 November 2019

Saudi driver Reema Juffali makes history as first woman to compete in Saudi Arabia

  • Juffali is VIP driver in the Jaguar I-PACE e-TROPHY
  • Ahead of the race she said: “I am very excited"

RIYADH: Reema Juffali made history on Friday by becoming the first Saudi Arabian female racer to drive competitively in the Kingdom.

As the VIP driver in the Jaguar I-PACE e-TROPHY, Reema took to the track at the Diriyah Circuit in the first round of the championship.

She completed her fastest lap of the track created in the heart of the UNESCO World Heritage site in 1 min 39 seconds, a little over 5 seconds behind the pole position driver.

She went into the official championship race at the back of the grid, but that took nothing away from the moment for the young driver from Jeddah.

"Many (people) are surprised by all the changes happening in Saudi.

"Seeing me in a car, racing, for a lot of people it's a surprise, but I am happy to surprise people," she said.

Prince Abdulaziz bin Turki Al-Faisal, Chairman of Saudi Arabia's General Sports Authority, touted it as a "watershed" moment for the Kingdom.

"Reema will have thousands cheering her on, as a professional racing driver," the prince said.

Juffali, who made one of her first appearances in competitive racing at the F4 British Championship at Brands Hatch in April, has only about a year of professional racing experience under her belt.

But she has had a passion for fast cars since her teenage years and grew up watching Formula One.

Ahead of the race she said: “I am very excited, I never thought this day would come, or at least I didn’t know when and it came a lot sooner than expected. I’m a year into racing and here I am now about to race at home which is an incredible feeling.”

The Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY series is the official support race the SAUDIA Diriyah E-Prix the opening double header for the ABB FIA Formula E Championship.


Steady Nadal beats animated Kyrgios in 4 at Australian Open

Updated 27 January 2020

Steady Nadal beats animated Kyrgios in 4 at Australian Open

  • Top-ranked Nadal kept his thoughts to himself and limited his shot-making to the more traditional variety
  • Nick Kyrgios delivered 25 aces and some memorable moments

MELBOURNE, Australia: Rafael Nadal left the muttering and the preening, the underarm serving and the ‘tweening, to his younger, flashier opponent, Nick Kyrgios.
Surely, Nadal was content to collect the win in the latest installment of their rivalry.
The No. 1-ranked Nadal kept his thoughts to himself and limited his shot-making to the more traditional variety in an entertaining 6-3, 3-6, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (4) victory over home-crowd favorite Kyrgios on Monday to reach the Australian Open quarterfinals and get closer to a record-tying 20th Grand Slam title.
Here’s how the elevated stakes and tension affected both men: At 5-all in the pivotal third-set tiebreaker, Kyrgios double-faulted. That offered up a gift-wrapped set point. But Nadal failed to take advantage because he double-faulted right back.
Still, two points later, the 23rd-seeded Kyrgios put a forehand into the net, and the set was Nadal’s. Not long after, Kyrgios double-faulted again to get broken at love.
That put Nadal ahead 2-1 in the fourth, seemingly in control. He faltered, though, while serving for the win at 5-4, double-faulting to create a pair of break points, the second of which Kyrgios converted with a jumping forehand and celebrated by throwing his head back and screaming. Spectators rose and roared and waved their Australian flags in support of the 24-year-old from Canberra.
Kyrgios delivered 25 aces and some memorable moments — including walking out on court and warming up for the match in a No. 8 Los Angeles Lakers jersey to honor Kobe Bryant, the five-time NBA champion and 18-time All-Star who died in a helicopter crash Sunday at age 41.
Nadal was just the better player overall. One measure: Nadal finished with more than twice as many winners, 64, as unforced errors, 27.