WEEKLY ENERGY RECAP: Spot market tightens

Oil prices were relatively steady with Brent crude holding above $63 per barrel near an eight-week high. (Reuters/File)
Updated 23 November 2019

WEEKLY ENERGY RECAP: Spot market tightens

  • US crude inventories rose by 1.8 million barrels despite refinery runs increasing by 519,000 bpd

Oil prices were relatively steady with Brent crude holding above $63 per barrel near an eight-week high and WTI finishing above $57 per barrel.

The physical spot market is getting tighter and strong demand for Arabian Gulf medium sour crude has reflected that trend.

So as yet, there are no signs of any weaker oil demand as had been anticipated.

Both OPEC and the International Energy Agency (IEA) have pointed to a swelling oil glut next year due to booming non-OPEC supplies, especially in the US.

The physical market tells a different story. The scenarios envisaged by both OPEC and the IEA are based around unrealistic outlooks that focus on lower projected oil demand as a likely consequence of the ongoing trade war between the US and China. As a result, the pair have warned about a looming supply glut which could emerge in 2020.

But again, the real physical market tightness suggests otherwise.

US crude inventories rose by 1.8 million barrels despite refinery runs increasing by 519,000 bpd. However, US crude in storage at the Cushing, Oklahoma, delivery hub for WTI fell 2.3 million barrels, which represents the biggest drawdown in three months, as reported by the IEA.

The US oil and gas rig count continued to fall in what was the 13th drop for the past 14 weeks. 

According to Baker Hughes, the US oil rig count is down three from last week to 671, with gas rigs unchanged at 129. US shale oil rigs also continued to drop.

The overall positive demand picture has encouraged money managers to continue to increase their net-long positions in Brent crude oil futures for the 4th consecutive week in a row. That followed nine months of decline.

Brent crude oil futures and options money managers increased their net-long positions by by 543 contracts to 311,304 in the week ending Nov. 19.

However, they cut net long positions in WTI crude oil futures and options by 19,593 contracts to 133,581, over the same period.


Aramco chief sees demand for oil staying above 100m barrels

Updated 19 min 18 sec ago

Aramco chief sees demand for oil staying above 100m barrels

  • A panel on the global energy outlook at the WEF in Davos heard that renewable energy alone would not be able to meet rising demand for power as more people moved into the middle class
  • The panel also heard that coal, not oil, remained the biggest source of carbon emissions

DAVOS: Aramco CEO Amin Nasser said he expected global oil demand to stay above the 100 million barrels threshold as the rise of the global middle class spurred demand for energy.
A panel on the global energy outlook at the World Economic Forum in Davos heard that renewable energy alone would not be able to meet rising demand for power as more people moved into the middle class.
“There will be additional demand and the only way to meet it is if you continue to provide affordable, reliable and viable energy to the rest of the world,” said the Aramco CEO.
“There is good penetration from renewables and electric cars are picking up however you need to consider what is happening in the world. There are still an additional 2 billion people coming. There are currently 3 billion people using biomass, animal dung, kerosene for cooking and there are 1 billion people today without electricity and almost 50 percent of people have never flown in an aeroplane.”
The panel heard that coal, not oil, remained the biggest source of carbon emissions but that the location of many coal-fired power plants in developing Asian economies meant that reducing its impact was a major challenge.
“The number one source of emissions by far is the coal fire power plants – they alone are responsible for one third of emissions,” said International Energy Agency Executive Director Fatih Birol. “But they are in many cases the number one source of electricity generation in low income countries - so this is not a black and white issue.”