WEEKLY ENERGY RECAP: Spot market tightens

WEEKLY ENERGY RECAP: Spot market tightens
Oil prices were relatively steady with Brent crude holding above $63 per barrel near an eight-week high. (Reuters/File)
Updated 23 November 2019

WEEKLY ENERGY RECAP: Spot market tightens

WEEKLY ENERGY RECAP: Spot market tightens
  • US crude inventories rose by 1.8 million barrels despite refinery runs increasing by 519,000 bpd

Oil prices were relatively steady with Brent crude holding above $63 per barrel near an eight-week high and WTI finishing above $57 per barrel.

The physical spot market is getting tighter and strong demand for Arabian Gulf medium sour crude has reflected that trend.

So as yet, there are no signs of any weaker oil demand as had been anticipated.

Both OPEC and the International Energy Agency (IEA) have pointed to a swelling oil glut next year due to booming non-OPEC supplies, especially in the US.

The physical market tells a different story. The scenarios envisaged by both OPEC and the IEA are based around unrealistic outlooks that focus on lower projected oil demand as a likely consequence of the ongoing trade war between the US and China. As a result, the pair have warned about a looming supply glut which could emerge in 2020.

But again, the real physical market tightness suggests otherwise.

US crude inventories rose by 1.8 million barrels despite refinery runs increasing by 519,000 bpd. However, US crude in storage at the Cushing, Oklahoma, delivery hub for WTI fell 2.3 million barrels, which represents the biggest drawdown in three months, as reported by the IEA.

The US oil and gas rig count continued to fall in what was the 13th drop for the past 14 weeks. 

According to Baker Hughes, the US oil rig count is down three from last week to 671, with gas rigs unchanged at 129. US shale oil rigs also continued to drop.

The overall positive demand picture has encouraged money managers to continue to increase their net-long positions in Brent crude oil futures for the 4th consecutive week in a row. That followed nine months of decline.

Brent crude oil futures and options money managers increased their net-long positions by by 543 contracts to 311,304 in the week ending Nov. 19.

However, they cut net long positions in WTI crude oil futures and options by 19,593 contracts to 133,581, over the same period.


Jubail aims to build the first Saudi-made car by 2022

Engineering designs for the first Saudi-produced car by 2022 are in advanced stages. (Shutterstock/File Photo)
Engineering designs for the first Saudi-produced car by 2022 are in advanced stages. (Shutterstock/File Photo)
Updated 16 January 2021

Jubail aims to build the first Saudi-made car by 2022

Engineering designs for the first Saudi-produced car by 2022 are in advanced stages. (Shutterstock/File Photo)
  • The move comes in coordination with South Korea’s SsangYong Motor Co. through setting up a car assembly center
  • Engineering designs are in advanced stages

RIYADH: The Royal Commission in Jubail started developing the infrastructure required for attracting three global automakers, Mohammad Al-Zahrani, Director of Industrial Investment Development Department told Al-Arabiya TV, expecting the first Saudi-made car in 2022.

The move comes in coordination with South Korea’s SsangYong Motor Co. through setting up a car assembly center. Engineering designs are in advanced stages, Al-Zahrani said.

The study conducted by the Royal Commission eyes to attract almost SR40 billion ($10.67 billion) direct investments to the automotive industry by 2040, Al-Zahrani added, noting that this sector will contribute SR80 billion to the Saudi Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and provide 27,000 direct jobs.

The Kingdom’s auto complex is part of the strategic industrial plan, as Jubail Industrial City and Ras Al-Khair Industrial City provide no less than 90 percent of the raw materials used in direct automobile manufacturing, he concluded.

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