‘My hijab isn’t going anywhere,’ model Halima Aden says

Updated 24 November 2019

‘My hijab isn’t going anywhere,’ model Halima Aden says

  • ‘My hijab is not going anywhere. Not today, not tomorrow, not (ever),’ she said on Instagram
  • The model made waves as the first-ever model to appear on a Fashion Week runway wearing a hijab

DUBAI: US-Somali model Halima Aden took to Instagram over the weekend to stand by her decision to carry on wearing her hijab, saying it “is not going anywhere.”

The model made waves as the first-ever model to appear on a Fashion Week runway wearing a hijab and also made history when she appeared on the 2019 issue of Sports Illustrated wearing a scarf and burkini.

“My hijab is not going anywhere. Not today, not tomorrow, not (ever). The road has been long and very painful at times, but also so incredibly rewarding. I’m not asking you to stop the criticism or double standards. I’m just asking you to see me as a human being. It’s easy to pass judgement when you’ve never walked a mile in someone’s shoes,” she wrote on Instagram this week, alongside a photo of herself as a grinning child wearing a headscarf.

She is the first hijab-wearing model to grace the cover of a Vogue magazine edition with her June 2017 Vogue Arabia cover.

It’s impressive for someone whose first chapters of life couldn’t be more far removed from the fashion industry. She was born in the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya, before relocating to the US with her family when she was six-years-old. 

She would go on to cinch bookings at renowned international brands, such as Alberta Ferretti and Max Mara, land major campaigns with the likes of Nike, Fenty Beauty and MAC Cosmetics and appear on the pages of prestigious publications.


What We Are Reading Today: Race Is About Politics Jean-Frederic Schaub

Updated 21 January 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Race Is About Politics Jean-Frederic Schaub

  • Schaub argues that to understand racism we must look at historical episodes of collective discrimination

Racial divisions have returned to the forefront of politics in the US and European societies, making it more important than ever to understand race and racism. 

But do we? In this original and provocative book, acclaimed historian Jean-Frédéric Schaub shows that we don’t— and that we need to rethink the widespread assumption that racism is essentially a modern form of discrimination based on skin color and other visible differences.

On the contrary, Schaub argues that to understand racism we must look at historical episodes of collective discrimination. Built around notions of identity and otherness, race is above all a political tool that must be understood in the context of its historical origins.

Although scholars agree that races don’t exist, they disagree about when these ideologies emerged. Drawing on historical research from the early modern period to today, Schaub makes the case that the key turning point in the political history of race in the West occurred not with the Atlantic slave trade and American slavery, as many historians have argued, but much earlier, in 15th-century Spain and Portugal, with the racialization of Christians of Jewish and Muslim origin.