‘My hijab isn’t going anywhere,’ model Halima Aden says

Updated 24 November 2019

‘My hijab isn’t going anywhere,’ model Halima Aden says

  • ‘My hijab is not going anywhere. Not today, not tomorrow, not (ever),’ she said on Instagram
  • The model made waves as the first-ever model to appear on a Fashion Week runway wearing a hijab

DUBAI: US-Somali model Halima Aden took to Instagram over the weekend to stand by her decision to carry on wearing her hijab, saying it “is not going anywhere.”

The model made waves as the first-ever model to appear on a Fashion Week runway wearing a hijab and also made history when she appeared on the 2019 issue of Sports Illustrated wearing a scarf and burkini.

“My hijab is not going anywhere. Not today, not tomorrow, not (ever). The road has been long and very painful at times, but also so incredibly rewarding. I’m not asking you to stop the criticism or double standards. I’m just asking you to see me as a human being. It’s easy to pass judgement when you’ve never walked a mile in someone’s shoes,” she wrote on Instagram this week, alongside a photo of herself as a grinning child wearing a headscarf.

She is the first hijab-wearing model to grace the cover of a Vogue magazine edition with her June 2017 Vogue Arabia cover.

It’s impressive for someone whose first chapters of life couldn’t be more far removed from the fashion industry. She was born in the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya, before relocating to the US with her family when she was six-years-old. 

She would go on to cinch bookings at renowned international brands, such as Alberta Ferretti and Max Mara, land major campaigns with the likes of Nike, Fenty Beauty and MAC Cosmetics and appear on the pages of prestigious publications.


California says film, TV production can resume this month

Updated 06 June 2020

California says film, TV production can resume this month

LOS ANGELES: California will allow film, television and music production to resume from June 12 if conditions permit after months of lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic, the governor's office said Friday.


Film and television productions in the Golden State have been shuttered since mid-March.


The reopening will be subject to approval by local health officers, the California Public Health Office said.


"To reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission, productions, cast, crew and other industry workers should abide by safety protocols agreed by labor and management, which may be further enhanced by county public health officers," it said.


However it is not clear if major Hollywood studios will be able to resume operations from next week because Los Angeles county is one of the main coronavirus epicenters in California, recording about half the infections and deaths in the state.


To date, more than 125,000 cases and 4,500 deaths have been confirmed in California.