Entrepreneur says young should be taught to follow passions, not just jobs

A 2018 World Bank report states that with digital technology moving at breakneck speed, many of the jobs today’s school children will have in 20 years are yet to be invented. (Shutterstock)
Updated 26 November 2019

Entrepreneur says young should be taught to follow passions, not just jobs

  • Social entrepreneur Anisa Al-Sharif said she believes people today do not need to discuss their employability and how they can attract recruiters, but instead how to develop their passions
  • According to the World Economic Forum, 65 percent of children entering primary school level education now will likely work in jobs that do not currently exist

SHARJAH: Society is killing young people’s creativity when it places the emphasis on finding jobs, rather than encouraging them to follow their passions, social entrepreneur Anisa Al-Sharif told Arab News.

“What we need to think of is how to make young people the best versions of themselves, and later they can decide whether they want to get a job or do something else,” she added.

A 2018 World Bank report stated that by 2050, the Middle East and North Africa region will need 300 million vacancies on offer to meet the growing population of young people entering the labor market.

And with digital technology moving at breakneck speed, many of the jobs today’s school children will have in 20 years are yet to be invented – posing society with wide reaching challenges such as what skill sets will be needed.

Al-Sharif said she believes people today do not need to discuss their employability and how they can attract recruiters, but instead how to develop their passions.

But Marwa Abduljawad, CEO of United Enterprises Company Ltd. (UNENCO) said while young people’s passions were important, graduates still needed to focus on the basic skill sets so they can also be attractive to potential employers.

These skills, she said, were ones that could be used in all lines of work and included communication, critical thinking, data analysis, creative thinking, and business ethics.

She admitted that schools had a role to play in helping students discover and follow their passion – helping them to build on them and use them effectively in a professional environment.

“Combining professional skills with passion can provide the market with graduates who are high performing employees,” she added.

Abduljawad said more is needed to be done to help students pursue their passion, while also developing the skills needed for a working environment, rather than just focusing on academia.

According to the World Economic Forum, 65 percent of children entering primary school level education now will likely work in jobs that do not currently exist.

Abduljawad said Saudi Arabia currently has a very limited number of schools that have started programs with non-profit organizations aimed at educating students on entrepreneurship.

“What needs to start in schools is providing extracurricular programs that teach students about entrepreneurship because I believe the field needs to be introduced early in life in order for students to grasp it, experiment it early in life with some ideas, and achieve confidence in oneself,” she added.

Abduljawad said media platforms should offer more information on entrepreneurship to children in the region.

“Unfortunately, media nowadays is brainwashing our kids and children with the concept of consumption and being at the consumer end, and not at the creation end or starting something that matters,” she said.

Abduljawad said she advises the media in the MENA region to encourage entrepreneurial mindset to children, as they are easily influenced by what content the media delivers to them. 

 


Oil surges on hopes of new deal on output cuts

Updated 02 June 2020

Oil surges on hopes of new deal on output cuts

  • Brent price has doubled in five weeks
  • OPEC talks may be brought forward

DUBAI: Oil prices surged toward $40 a barrel on Monday as hopes rose for an early agreement to extend the big production cuts agreed by Saudi Arabia and Russia under the OPEC+ alliance.

Brent, the global benchmark, jumped by more 9 percent to nearly $39, continuing the surge that has doubled the price in five weeks — the best performance in its history. It recovered after record supply cuts agreed between the 23 countries of the OPEC+ partnership, and enforced cuts in US shale oil.

DME Oman crude, the regional benchmark in which a lot of Saudi Aramco exports are priced, rose above $40 a barrel for the first time since early March.

Market sentiment was buoyed by the possibility that the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries would agree with non-OPEC members to extend the cuts for a longer period than was agreed in April.

Oil analysts expect OPEC to fast track a “virtual” meeting to formally agree to maintaining cuts at the record 9.7 million barrels a day level. The meeting was scheduled for June 9, but bringing it forward would allow producers more time to set pricing levels.

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An official with one OPEC delegation told Arab News there was consensus among the 23 OPEC+ members for the new date, which could be as early as June 4. The meeting will also consider how long the current level of cuts would be maintained. Some OPEC members want it to run to the end of the year, other producers would prefer a two-month extension.

Omar Najia, global head of derivatives with trader BB Energy, told a forum run by Gulf Intelligence consultancy: “I’d be amazed if OPEC did not extend the higher level of cuts. As long as Saudi Arabia and Russia continue saying nice things to each other I’d expect the rally to continue.”

A Moscow source close to the oil industry said energy officials there had come to the conclusion that “the deal is working” and it was important to keep prices at an “acceptable” level.

Sentiment was also affected by a comparatively high level of compliance with the new cuts, running at about 75 percent among OPEC+ members, with only Iraq and Nigeria noticeable under-compliers.

Robin Mills, chief executive of Qamar Energy, said: “That’s where I’d expect it to be after two months in such a fluid situation. It will be even better in June.”