Entrepreneur says young should be taught to follow passions, not just jobs

A 2018 World Bank report states that with digital technology moving at breakneck speed, many of the jobs today’s school children will have in 20 years are yet to be invented. (Shutterstock)
Updated 26 November 2019

Entrepreneur says young should be taught to follow passions, not just jobs

  • Social entrepreneur Anisa Al-Sharif said she believes people today do not need to discuss their employability and how they can attract recruiters, but instead how to develop their passions
  • According to the World Economic Forum, 65 percent of children entering primary school level education now will likely work in jobs that do not currently exist

SHARJAH: Society is killing young people’s creativity when it places the emphasis on finding jobs, rather than encouraging them to follow their passions, social entrepreneur Anisa Al-Sharif told Arab News.

“What we need to think of is how to make young people the best versions of themselves, and later they can decide whether they want to get a job or do something else,” she added.

A 2018 World Bank report stated that by 2050, the Middle East and North Africa region will need 300 million vacancies on offer to meet the growing population of young people entering the labor market.

And with digital technology moving at breakneck speed, many of the jobs today’s school children will have in 20 years are yet to be invented – posing society with wide reaching challenges such as what skill sets will be needed.

Al-Sharif said she believes people today do not need to discuss their employability and how they can attract recruiters, but instead how to develop their passions.

But Marwa Abduljawad, CEO of United Enterprises Company Ltd. (UNENCO) said while young people’s passions were important, graduates still needed to focus on the basic skill sets so they can also be attractive to potential employers.

These skills, she said, were ones that could be used in all lines of work and included communication, critical thinking, data analysis, creative thinking, and business ethics.

She admitted that schools had a role to play in helping students discover and follow their passion – helping them to build on them and use them effectively in a professional environment.

“Combining professional skills with passion can provide the market with graduates who are high performing employees,” she added.

Abduljawad said more is needed to be done to help students pursue their passion, while also developing the skills needed for a working environment, rather than just focusing on academia.

According to the World Economic Forum, 65 percent of children entering primary school level education now will likely work in jobs that do not currently exist.

Abduljawad said Saudi Arabia currently has a very limited number of schools that have started programs with non-profit organizations aimed at educating students on entrepreneurship.

“What needs to start in schools is providing extracurricular programs that teach students about entrepreneurship because I believe the field needs to be introduced early in life in order for students to grasp it, experiment it early in life with some ideas, and achieve confidence in oneself,” she added.

Abduljawad said media platforms should offer more information on entrepreneurship to children in the region.

“Unfortunately, media nowadays is brainwashing our kids and children with the concept of consumption and being at the consumer end, and not at the creation end or starting something that matters,” she said.

Abduljawad said she advises the media in the MENA region to encourage entrepreneurial mindset to children, as they are easily influenced by what content the media delivers to them. 

 


Aramco chief sees demand for oil staying above 100m barrels

Updated 23 January 2020

Aramco chief sees demand for oil staying above 100m barrels

  • A panel on the global energy outlook at the WEF in Davos heard that renewable energy alone would not be able to meet rising demand for power as more people moved into the middle class
  • The panel also heard that coal, not oil, remained the biggest source of carbon emissions

DAVOS: Aramco CEO Amin Nasser said he expected global oil demand to stay above the 100 million barrels threshold as the rise of the global middle class spurred demand for energy.
A panel on the global energy outlook at the World Economic Forum in Davos heard that renewable energy alone would not be able to meet rising demand for power as more people moved into the middle class.
“There will be additional demand and the only way to meet it is if you continue to provide affordable, reliable and viable energy to the rest of the world,” said the Aramco CEO.
“There is good penetration from renewables and electric cars are picking up however you need to consider what is happening in the world. There are still an additional 2 billion people coming. There are currently 3 billion people using biomass, animal dung, kerosene for cooking and there are 1 billion people today without electricity and almost 50 percent of people have never flown in an aeroplane.”
The panel heard that coal, not oil, remained the biggest source of carbon emissions but that the location of many coal-fired power plants in developing Asian economies meant that reducing its impact was a major challenge.
“The number one source of emissions by far is the coal fire power plants – they alone are responsible for one third of emissions,” said International Energy Agency Executive Director Fatih Birol. “But they are in many cases the number one source of electricity generation in low income countries - so this is not a black and white issue.”