Jessica Kahawaty curates special collection for Miu Miu

Updated 26 November 2019

Jessica Kahawaty curates special collection for Miu Miu

  • Jessica Kahawaty’s latest style endeavor is a partnership with Italian label Miu Miu
  • Past figures who have participated in the initiative include models Georgia May Jagger and Hailey Benton Gates

DUBAI: When Jessica Kahawaty is not busy visiting refugee camps off the border of Syria, championing women’s rights or turning heads on front rows in Paris and Milan, she can be found shaking up the fashion industry.

Her latest style endeavor is a partnership with Italian label Miu Miu, as part of its “Miu Miu Select” project. She handpicked a selection of her favorite pieces from the brand’s Resort 2020 collection. 

Among the Lebanese-Australian beauty’s favorite pieces from the 51-look collection are a blue knit cardigan, a black button-up blouse with flower-embroidered lapels, a beaded chain purse and a velvet, crystal-studded bow tie. What’s more, the tags of each carefully-curated item are emblazoned with the model and humanitarian’s signature.

The 31-year-old joins blogger-turned-designer Alexa Chung and British model Poppy Delevingne, who were also picked by Miu Miu to curate their favorite items from Miuccia Prada’s horse riding-inspired collection. 

Past figures who have participated in the initiative include models Georgia May Jagger and Hailey Benton Gates as well as actress Chloe Sevigny. 

Kahawty first unveiled details of the exciting news on Instagram, writing: “Super excited to announce my special curated pieces from the Miu Miu Croisière 2020 show. Stay tuned for the big ‘Select’ launch tomorrow.”

Each of the cherry-picked, ready-to-wear and accessories items will be available to shop at Miu Miu boutiques for a limited time, including the model and activist’s closet must-haves.

The collaboration with the Italian womenswear label is just another achievement in the former Miss World Australia’s ever-growing portfolio. In the past, she’s appeared in a number of commercials, including for Maybelline Cosmetics, hair care company Wella and Lexus. 

She’s also starred in a stunning campaign for Egyptian fashion agency Maison Pyramide to raise funds for the Helm Foundation, a charity dedicated to helping empower people living with disabilities. Additionally, in 2018, fashion house Louis Vuitton selected Kahawaty to work with UNICEF at the Za’atari refugee camp in Jordan to help children affected by the Syrian crisis.

Kahawaty studied business, finance and law in Sydney and then made a move into modelling and event hosting. The social media influencer is also keen supporter of a number of humanitarian causes, including the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).

“Miu Miu Select” was launched by the fashion house earlier this year. The initiative invites tastemakers from all over the world to curate a highly-personalized selection of their favorite ready-to-wear and accessories pieces from the brand’s most recent season.


What We Are Reading Today: Race Is About Politics Jean-Frederic Schaub

Updated 21 January 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Race Is About Politics Jean-Frederic Schaub

  • Schaub argues that to understand racism we must look at historical episodes of collective discrimination

Racial divisions have returned to the forefront of politics in the US and European societies, making it more important than ever to understand race and racism. 

But do we? In this original and provocative book, acclaimed historian Jean-Frédéric Schaub shows that we don’t— and that we need to rethink the widespread assumption that racism is essentially a modern form of discrimination based on skin color and other visible differences.

On the contrary, Schaub argues that to understand racism we must look at historical episodes of collective discrimination. Built around notions of identity and otherness, race is above all a political tool that must be understood in the context of its historical origins.

Although scholars agree that races don’t exist, they disagree about when these ideologies emerged. Drawing on historical research from the early modern period to today, Schaub makes the case that the key turning point in the political history of race in the West occurred not with the Atlantic slave trade and American slavery, as many historians have argued, but much earlier, in 15th-century Spain and Portugal, with the racialization of Christians of Jewish and Muslim origin.