Bella Hadid does her bit for the environment with tree pledge

Bella Hadid made the announcement on Instagram. (File/AFP)
Updated 30 November 2019

Bella Hadid does her bit for the environment with tree pledge

  • The 23-year-old style star took to Instagram this week to announce that she will donate 600 trees in a post featuring a slide show of images

DUBAI: US-Palestinian model Bella Hadid is taking steps to help the environment, something she says is important to her because of the many flights she has to take as an internationally in-demand model.

Known for jetting from runway to runway, the 23-year-old style star took to Instagram this week to announce that she will donate 600 trees in a post featuring a slide show of images —a mother-earth like illustration and screenshots of information about the vital role trees play in both the Amazon and California.



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Donating 600 trees to be planted , 20 for each flight I took these past 3 months and probably will continue for the rest of the year.It makes me sad how much my job effects my carbon footprint and of how brutally climate change is obviously effecting the world. Mother Nature needs some love... I’ll be starting with my home in California ( 129 million trees need to be restored re: wildfires, 1.3 million acres burned) and of course the Amazon for the most recent wildfires, but please reach out and let me know which locations need to be shown some love as well , all regions welcome Africa, Asia, North America, and Latin America this is so exciting and interesting to me, that even though I’m not physically there, trees are being brought to life in the most incredible places that are in demand of them! it’s the air we breathe, the water we drink, the biodiversity and animal life we need.. I know it’s not much , but when I fly, I look out the window and see so many beautiful, extensive forests, so much land and trees but also so much that needs lots of help.. think about the animals too anyways . once I get home I’m definitely planting my own tree outside. so inspired by my friends ps I did some research and onetreeplanted.org is probably the easiest website I’ve found to donate to multiple regions at the same time, if you’re interested:)

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“Donating 600 trees to be planted , 20 for each flight I took these past three months and probably will continue for the rest of the year,” she captioned the post.

“It makes me sad how much my job effects my carbon footprint and of how brutally climate change is obviously effecting the world. Mother Nature needs some love. I’ll be starting with my home in California (129 million trees need to be restored re: wildfires, 1.3 million acres burned) and of course the Amazon for the most recent wildfires, but please reach out and let me know which locations need to be shown some love as well, all regions welcome. Africa, Asia, North America, and Latin America (sic),” she continued.

Air travel is a major source of carbon emissions — a one-way trip from New York City to London emits one ton of carbon dioxide per passenger, Vox reported.

“This is so exciting and interesting to me, that even though I’m not physically there, trees are being brought to life in the most incredible places that are in demand of them! It’s the air we breathe, the water we drink, the biodiversity and animal life we need. I know it’s not much , but when I fly, I look out the window and see so many beautiful, extensive forests, so much land and trees but also so much that needs lots of help,” Hadid added in her post.


World’s shortest man dies in Nepal at 27

In this file photo taken on September 24, 2010 Nepalese teenager Khagendra Thapa Magar poses for a picture with Miss Nepal Sadichha Shrestha (C) and first runner-up Sahana Bajracharya (R) and second runner-up Samyukta Timilsina (L) in Kathmandu. (AFP)
Updated 18 January 2020

World’s shortest man dies in Nepal at 27

  • Magar became an official face of Nepal’s tourism campaign, which featured him as the smallest man in a country that is home to the world’s highest peak, Mount Everest

KATMANDU: The world’s shortest man who could walk, as verified by Guinness World Records, died Friday at a hospital in Nepal, his family said.
Khagendra Thapa Magar, who measured 67.08 centimeters (2 feet 2.41 inches), died of pneumonia at a hospital in Pokhara, 200 kilometers from Katmandu, where he lived with his parents.
“He has been in and out of hospital because of pneumonia. But this time his heart was also affected. He passed away today,” Mahesh Thapa Magar, his brother, told AFP.
Magar was first declared the world’s shortest man in 2010 after his 18th birthday, photographed holding a certificate only a bit smaller than him.
However he eventually lost the title after Nepal’s Chandra Bahadur Dangi, who measured 54.6 centimeters, was discovered and named the world’s shortest mobile man.
Magar regained the title after Dangi’s death in 2015.
“He was so tiny when he was born that he could fit in the palm of your hand, and it was very hard to bathe him because he was so small,” said his father, Roop Bahadur, according to Guinness World Records.
As the world’s shortest man the 27-year-old traveled to more than a dozen countries and made television appearances in Europe and the United States.
“We’re terribly sad to hear the news from Nepal that Khagendra is no longer with us,” said Craig Glenday, Guinness World Records editor-in-chief.
“Life can be challenging when you weigh just 6 kilograms and you don’t fit into a world built for the average person. But Khagendra certainly didn’t let his small size stop him from getting the most out of life” he said.
Magar became an official face of Nepal’s tourism campaign, which featured him as the smallest man in a country that is home to the world’s highest peak, Mount Everest.
During his stint he met other short people around the world, including the shortest woman, Jyoti Amge, from India.
In a video released by Guinness World Records, Magar is seen playing a guitar with his brother, riding a bike and sitting at his family’s shop.
The world’s shortest non-mobile man remains Junrey Balawing of the Philippines, who measures only 59.93 centimeters but is unable to walk or stand unaided, according to Guinness World Records.
The record for shortest living mobile man is now retained by Edward “Nino” Hernandez of Colombia, a reggaeton DJ who stands 70.21 centimeters tall, Guinness said.