ThePlace: Eimarah Palace of Najran

Najran's Eimarah Palace as seen from the window of another mud house nearby. (Saudi Tourism photo)
Updated 30 November 2019

ThePlace: Eimarah Palace of Najran

The traditional architecture of Saudi Arabia’s southwestern Najran region is characterized by its distinctive mud houses and palaces which are widely considered to be the best-preserved buildings of their kind in the world.

One unique example of the architectural style is Eimarah Palace which was constructed in 1942 during the time of Prince Turki bin Mohammed Al-Madhi.

It is used as the office for the governorate as well as providing accommodation for the governor, his family and guards.
 


ThePlace: Al-Rajajeel, in the northwestern Saudi province of Al-Jouf

(Photo/Saudi Tourism)
Updated 5 min 30 sec ago

ThePlace: Al-Rajajeel, in the northwestern Saudi province of Al-Jouf

  • Each group of columns is made up of between two and 10 stones which stand perpendicular to the plateau and are thought to be the motifs for funeral rituals

The archeological site of Al-Rajajeel (meaning “the Men”) consists of a group of stone pillars believed to date from the fourth century B.C.
Located 22 km south of Sakaka, in the northwestern Saudi province of Al-Jouf, there are 50 separate sets of standing stones all approximately 3 meters high.
They bear unknown inscriptions and are randomly positioned on a series of low terraces overlooking a wide valley which is intersected by a road leading to the Nafud region.
Each group of columns is made up of between two and 10 stones which stand perpendicular to the plateau and are thought to be the motifs for funeral rituals.
This photograph was taken by Sultan Al-Zaid as part of the Colors of Saudi competition.