Supercars go under the hammer in RM Sotheby’s auction at Abu Dhabi F1

Motorsport enthusiasts can expect to see one of the best hyper-car and supercar lineups ever presented for public sale. (Supplied)
Updated 02 December 2019

Supercars go under the hammer in RM Sotheby’s auction at Abu Dhabi F1

  • Motorsport enthusiasts can expect to see one of the best hyper-car and supercar lineups ever presented for public sale
  • The auction’s undisputed star lot is a Ferrari F2002

ABU DHABI: During the Abu Dhabi Formula 1 Grand Prix, which is taking place from Nov. 29- Dec. 1, classic car auction company RM Sotheby’s is holding its first-ever auction in the Middle East. Featuring an expertly curated selection of 40 high-performance vehicles, the auction will take place on Nov. 30 at the Yas Marina Circuit.

Motorsport enthusiasts can expect to see one of the best hyper-car and supercar lineups ever presented for public sale.




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The auction’s undisputed star lot is a Ferrari F2002. It is estimated to sell for as much as $7.5 million. The reason for its elevated value?  German racing driver Michael Schumacher drove it to victory three times during the 2002 season, helping him to secure his fifth world championship at the French Grand Prix. A portion of the winning bid will also support Schumacher’s Keep Fighting Foundation.

Meanwhile, a rare Mercedes-McLaren collaboration that can go from zero to 62 mph in 3.5 seconds is also up for grabs. The supercharged AMG V-8, which is one of 75, is estimated to sell for as much as $2.7 million in Abu Dhabi.




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Among the highlights is also one-of-50 example of Maserati’s iconic 21st-century supercar, a 2005 Maserati MC12.

Another eye-catching lot is undoubtedly the 2011 Aston Martin One-77, which is the 38th make out of 77 of the luxury vehicle company’s hypercar. The sparingly-driven super car, which is being auctioned by the original owner Markus Jebsen, founder of Auction4Wildlife, currently boasts under 1,000 km. All proceeds from the sale of the One-77 will go towards African Parks.




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The auction coincides with RM Sotheby’s online-only sale of F1 memorabilia taking place during the end of November to the beginning of December that features more than 100 items ranging from signed racing helmets and gloves to car parts.

Scroll down for the highlights from the show...

2002 Ferrari F2002

German racing driver Michael Schumacher drove this vehicle to victory three times during the 2002 season, helping him to secure his fifth world championship at the 2002 French Grand Prix.




(Supplied)

2011 Aston Martin One-77

The sparingly-driven super car currently boasts under 1,000 km. All proceeds from the sale of the One-77 will go towards African Parks.




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2005 Maserati MC12

Defined by its colossal rear spoiler and removable hardtop, this iconic 21st century sports car is one out of just 50 ever made. 




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2008 Rolls-Royce Phantom Drophead Coupé

The car sports an eye-catching and seldom-seen colour combination of Semaphore Yellow over a light beige interior and dark beige soft top.




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1999 Lamborghini Diablo VT Roadster

Introduced in 1990 as the successor to the legendary Countach, the Lamborghini Diablo was the company’s signature 1990s model.




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1956 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Gullwing

What would result became a true automotive icon of its era. Mercedes-Benz’s 300 SL was the industry benchmark for performance in the 1950s, pioneering a number of cutting-edge technologies.




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Underground ‘Electrosteen:’ merges ‘Palestinian folk music with a modern electronic sound’

Work on “Electrosteen” began in 2017 with a two-week residency in Ramallah, Palestine. (Supplied)
Updated 3 min 21 sec ago

Underground ‘Electrosteen:’ merges ‘Palestinian folk music with a modern electronic sound’

  • New album blends traditional Palestinian music with electro sounds

CAIRO: New release “Electrosteen,” merges “Palestinian folk music with a modern electronic sound,” according to the press release from Mostakell Records, the Cairo-based independent label distributing the album.  

A play-on the words ‘Electronic’ and ‘Falasteen’ (Palestine), the record brings together some of the country’s finest underground electronic music producers and DJs in “a cooperative take on Palestinian folk, roots and traditional song, mined from the archives of the Popular Art Center of Ramallah to give birth to an urban contemporary celebration of Palestinian heritage.” 

A pre-launch concert for the album was held at the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris last year. (AFP)

The album’s stellar line-up comprises ​SAMA’,​ J​ulmud​, A​l Nather,​ M​uqata’a​, S​arouna M.,​ Nasser Halahlih​, B​runo Cruz​, and Walaa Sbait​ (of 47 Soul), in addition to guest appearances by Basel Naouri​, M​ehdi Haddab​ (Speed Caravan), and S​habjdeed​. A pre-launch concert for the album was held at the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris last year.

“The objective behind the album was to take our Palestinian turath (heritage) to electronic music festivals,” said album producer Rashid Abdelhamid, founder of Made in Palestine Project, an arts initiative “developing the appreciation of contemporary visual art and culture with a particular focus on Palestine,” according to its Facebook page.

Rashid Abdelhamid is the founder of Made in Palestine Project. (AFP)

Work on “Electrosteen” began in 2017 with a two-week residency in Ramallah, Palestine. Selected musicians were given access to an audio library owned by the Popular Art Center of Ramallah, and “collected from existing archives or recorded from professional and amateur urban, rural and Bedouin musicians,” according to the album description. 

“Recordings go back 20 or 30 years. They were spontaneous and were made in Palestinian villages,” Abdelhamid told Arab News. “The artists were asked to work together to produce two original tracks each.” 

A pre-launch concert for the album was held at the Institut du Monde Arabe in Paris last year. (AFP)

Those tracks, Abdelhamid said, are not simple “remixes” of folkloric samples. Rather, they are original productions that sampled those recordings. 

“It was completely up to the musicians which recordings they used or how they incorporated them into their music. They used samples and sounds to create their own tracks, in much the same manner as adding Palestinian spices to one’s own creations,” Abdelhamid explained. 

“The flavor of Palestinian turath remains very much present,” he added. 

A play-on the words ‘Electronic’ and ‘Falasteen’ (Palestine), the record brings together some of the country’s finest underground electronic music producers. (Supplied)

Each night, the group held listening sessions and shared feedback. “It was a very democratic process,” said Abdelhamid, adding that even the album title was chosen collaboratively.

“Electrosteen” introduces an “alternative vision of Palestine” and shines “a spotlight on Palestine's cultural vitality and relevance in the contemporary world.” 

In choosing electronic music, with its “universality and its political value,” the album “might very well play an important part in the struggle for a free and respected Palestine.”

“Electrosteen” should also make listeners rethink the Palestinian victimhood narrative, the press release suggests, and, with it, long-standing stereotypes that depicts Palestine and Palestinians solely “through the camera lens of war, occupation, in-fighting, and humanitarian strife.” 

“I’m sick of the current image of the Palestinian-as-victim,” Abdelhamid adds.  

In choosing electronic music, with its “universality and its political value,” the album “might very well play an important part in the struggle for a free and respected Palestine.” (Supplied)

It is not the politics that bothers Abdelhamid per se, because, “as Palestinians, waking up every day is, in and of itself, a political act. Everything we do in life is essentially political.” Rather, it is the abuse and appropriation of the Palestinian cause by art and artists that truly frustrates him. With “Electrosteen,” he said, “My main aim was to encourage the preservation and celebration of our Palestinian identity when performing electronic music in the West, and to introduce ourselves as musicians who have something to offer, instead of just ‘victims.’” 

And for the producer, at least, the record meets those aims. “I’m very happy with the end result. And I think ‘Electrosteen II’ might follow soon,” he said.  Although given his perpetual involvement in multiple new projects, it might not be easy for him to find the time.

“Whether it’s the production of films, music, or other art forms, in my own way I am constantly trying to shed light on anything beautiful in and about Palestine.”