Off-track eats: Where to fuel up at the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix

Updated 30 November 2019

Off-track eats: Where to fuel up at the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix

ABU DHABI: A number of eateries are hosting pop-ups during the Formula 1 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix. Read on for our guide for where to chow down at the races.

Black Tap

From New York to the UAE, renowned burger joint Black Tap is as famous for its multi-layered, cheese-oozing burgers as it is for its wild, over-the-top milkshakes. Racegoers can find a Black Tap stall at the Yas Marina Circuit for their fast food cravings.




Renowned burger joint Black Tap is as famous for its multi-layered, cheese-oozing burgers. (Arab News) 

Mr. Miyagi

The Asian eatery has a pop-up at the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix — get your pad thai and sticky rice fix here.




The Asian eatery has a pop-up at the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix. (Arab News)

Ramusake

The famed Japanese eatery is hosting a pop-up location, complete with a terrace, at the F1. Head down for a delectable mix of fine Asian cuisine.

Chick & Co.

Are you a fan of fried chicken? Grab yourself a crunchy chicken sandwich, or fresh, steaming hot tenders at this funky food truck.




Grab yourself a crunchy chicken sandwich. (Arab News)

Arabic Street Food

This food truck does what it says on the tin — expect hot, crunchy falafel, fragrant shawarmas.




This food truck does what it says on the tin. (Arab News)

Fresh Heavenly Delights

Finish it all off with a scoop of gelato from this colorful spot, located within the grounds of the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix.




Finish it all off with a scoop of gelato. (Arab News)

 


What We Are Reading Today: Life in a Cold Climate by Laura Thompson

Updated 06 December 2019

What We Are Reading Today: Life in a Cold Climate by Laura Thompson

In an enjoyable biography of an interesting woman, Laura Thompson effectively analyses Nancy Mitford’s work in the context of her life and loves.

Mitford “was obviously a much more complex character than many modern accounts paint her and this book certainly demonstrates this,” said a review in goodreads.com.

A stylish and well-informed writer, Thompson brings a snobbishness of her own to her sympathetic account of Mitford’s life.

Christopher Benfey said in a review for The New York Times: “The firmness of Mitford’s anti-fascist views was put to the test during World War II when she was approached by British intelligence to spy on General de Gaulle’s Free French officer corps in London. A mole was apparently passing information to the collaborationist Vichy regime. Thompson tells us frustratingly little about this episode. Instead, she trains her attention on Mitford’s love affair with one of the officers, Charles de Gaulle’s right-hand man and chief political adviser, Gaston Palewski, a heavyset man with a Hitler mustache and receding hair.”