Off-track eats: Where to fuel up at the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix

Updated 30 November 2019

Off-track eats: Where to fuel up at the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix

ABU DHABI: A number of eateries are hosting pop-ups during the Formula 1 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix. Read on for our guide for where to chow down at the races.

Black Tap

From New York to the UAE, renowned burger joint Black Tap is as famous for its multi-layered, cheese-oozing burgers as it is for its wild, over-the-top milkshakes. Racegoers can find a Black Tap stall at the Yas Marina Circuit for their fast food cravings.




Renowned burger joint Black Tap is as famous for its multi-layered, cheese-oozing burgers. (Arab News) 

Mr. Miyagi

The Asian eatery has a pop-up at the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix — get your pad thai and sticky rice fix here.




The Asian eatery has a pop-up at the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix. (Arab News)

Ramusake

The famed Japanese eatery is hosting a pop-up location, complete with a terrace, at the F1. Head down for a delectable mix of fine Asian cuisine.

Chick & Co.

Are you a fan of fried chicken? Grab yourself a crunchy chicken sandwich, or fresh, steaming hot tenders at this funky food truck.




Grab yourself a crunchy chicken sandwich. (Arab News)

Arabic Street Food

This food truck does what it says on the tin — expect hot, crunchy falafel, fragrant shawarmas.




This food truck does what it says on the tin. (Arab News)

Fresh Heavenly Delights

Finish it all off with a scoop of gelato from this colorful spot, located within the grounds of the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix.




Finish it all off with a scoop of gelato. (Arab News)

 


This Lebanese food shop is providing meals for Beirut blast victims

Updated 12 August 2020

This Lebanese food shop is providing meals for Beirut blast victims

DUBAI: On the night of the Beirut port blasts, which killed 154 civilians and injured thousands on August 4, Lebanese food shop owner Nabil Khoury and his brother decided to launch one of the very first initiatives for distributing packaged meals to those impacted by the catastrophe. Within a week, more than 3,000 meals have been cooked in the kitchen of Khoury’s vegetarian delicatessen, “Dry & Raw.”

In an Instagram post, the company shared: “We are all one in this. This is the least we can do for you, for us and for our country.”

With the help of staff and numerous young volunteers, along with Khoury’s loyal clients (who generously donated meat and poultry), a variety of hot meals incorporating carbohydrates and proteins, sandwiches and salads have been distributed to many, including selfless medical doctors, volunteers and families in need.

“With the donations, I cannot tell you how much people love to help each other — it’s overwhelming,” Khoury, 45, told Arab News.

He collaborated with the Lebanese Red Cross, the Lebanese Food Bank and local NGO Hot Pot Meal to deliver food to different parts of Beirut, such as Gemmayze, Mar Mikhael and Karantina, which were all severely damaged by the explosions.

“No picture or video could describe the damage that has occurred,” he explained, adding how the country was already suffering from an economic meltdown and the coronavirus pandemic. “In the early hours, people were busy helping each other, takingothers to hospitals, and burying the dead. But now, they are very angry at the whole system. Our government has resigned, but this is not the solution — the whole corrupt system has to step down. This explosion broke the last bone in our back.”

Having previously worked for NGOs, Khoury opened “Dry & Raw” in February 2020; a few months after the October uprising that witnessed nationwide anti-government protests.

Encouraging local food production, Khoury claims the conceptual shop is the “first of its kind” in Lebanon, offering organic, vegan, gluten-free and vegetarian foods, which have been produced in-house.

In addition, select produce is grown at the shop’s own farm.

Khoury recalled: “People criticized the fact that we opened the shop in the midst of an economic crisis, but we said: ‘This is the future and we should really start local production now’.”