Japanese man arrested for ‘making 24,000 complaint calls’

Japan is seeing an increasing number of social problems caused by the nation’s rapidly aging population. (File/AFP)
Updated 03 December 2019

Japanese man arrested for ‘making 24,000 complaint calls’

  • Tokyo police said they took 71-year-old Akitoshi Okamoto into custody last week after he made hundreds of toll-free calls over eight days
  • He has been arrested on suspicion of “fraudulent obstruction of business”

TOKYO: A Japanese pensioner has been arrested after ringing a phone company 24,000 times to complain they had violated his contract, police and local media reported.
Tokyo police said they took 71-year-old Akitoshi Okamoto into custody last week after he made hundreds of toll-free calls over eight days to the customer service section of major telephone operator KDDI.
But this could be the tip of the iceberg, with media outlets reporting that he made thousands more calls from public pay phones to voice his displeasure with the company and insult customer service staff.
“He demanded that KDDI staff come to him to apologize for violating his contract. He also repeatedly hung up his calls immediately after placing them,” a police spokesman said.
He has been arrested on suspicion of “fraudulent obstruction of business,” the spokesman added.
Japan is seeing an increasing number of social problems caused by the nation’s rapidly aging population.
Old drivers frequently cause fatal car accidents and railway operators have reported a spike in passenger violence against their staff from elderly customers.


Twitter poll: Turkey’s intimidation of Greece won’t stop poll respondents say

Updated 20 September 2020

Twitter poll: Turkey’s intimidation of Greece won’t stop poll respondents say

  • About 72 percent of respondents to the Twitter poll say they think Turkey is reckless

DUBAI: More than 70 percent of respondents to an Arab News poll said they think Turkey will continue its intimidation of Greece over issues in the eastern Mediterranean, despite warnings from the European Union for Ankara to defuse tension with Athens.

About 72 percent of respondents to the Twitter poll said they thought Turkey was reckless, while 28 percent of the 1,321 who took part thought otherwise, stating that Ankara was afraid and would eventually back down.

The two neighbors have been involved in a standoff for weeks, precipitated by Turkey’s deployment of the Oruc Reis seismic survey vessel, and escorted by a flotilla of navy frigates, near the Greek island of Kastellorizo purportedly to search for oil and gas.

Tension rose a notch higher when both countries held military exercises in the eastern Mediterranean, with Greece joined by France, Italy and Cyprus in late August and Turkey conducting its own drill in early September.

A European Parliament resolution has called for sanctions against Turkey unless it showed ‘sincere cooperation and concrete progress’ in defusing tensions with EU members Greece and Cyprus.

 

 

The resolution also called for Turkey to “immediately end any further illegal exploration and drilling activities in the Eastern Mediterranean, by refraining from violating Greek airspace and Greek and Cypriot territorial waters and by distancing itself from nationalistic warmongering rhetoric.”

Current EU leader Germany is pushing for mediation efforts regarding the issue, while France wants punitive measures against Turkey in support of Cyprus and Greece.