Documentary series highlights UAE’s rich, unknown past 

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The "History of the Emirates" series is narrated by Academy Award-winner Jeremy Irons and presented by Image Nation Abu Dhabi and produced by Atlantic Productions. (AN Photo/Tarek Ali Ahmad)
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The "History of the Emirates" series is narrated by Academy Award-winner Jeremy Irons and presented by Image Nation Abu Dhabi and produced by Atlantic Productions. (AN Photo/Tarek Ali Ahmad)
Updated 03 December 2019

Documentary series highlights UAE’s rich, unknown past 

  • The series is narrated by Academy Award-winner Jeremy Irons
  • The series profiles the foundations of the country’s civilizations

LONDON: The UAE Embassy in London hosted the screening of the first episode of “History of the Emirates” last week — a series tracing the country’s history in the lead up to its National Day on Dec. 2.

The series — narrated by Academy Award-winner Jeremy Irons, and presented by Image Nation Abu Dhabi and produced by Atlantic Productions — traces the UAE’s history by stretching back “125,000 years and culminating in the union in 1971.”

Series producer Antony Geffen told Arab News: “Some people know about independence, the oil years and pearl diving, but few know about the economic successes and the extraordinary past that goes back thousands of years. This history isn’t known locally or around the world.”

He said: “I was constantly amazed at how Emiratis had adapted to their environment, overcoming the challenges of living in an arid landscape, from domesticating camels 3,000 years ago to engineering oases through the use of underground water channels and pioneering trading across the oceans.”

The series profiles the foundations of the country’s civilizations, with a three-part version airing internationally on National Geographic, and a five-part local version that focuses on society, innovation, trade, belief and unity. 

The first episode, “Society,” opens the UAE’s story 125,000 years ago, following the earliest human migrations out of Africa and the birth of civilizations, as well as the beginning of the majlis system of consultation-driven governance and the UAE’s enduring belief in equality.

Fully immersive viewing

The series takes advantage of the latest cutting-edge technology in order to fully immerse the viewer into the UAE’s history.

“To really bring ‘History of the Emirates’ alive, we used a huge array of different techniques,” Geffen said.

“We used dramatizations, a special scanning technique called LiDar to capture lost civilizations across the desert, and then bring them back in CGI, drone and aerial filming to capture the extraordinary landscape of different areas of the country,” he added.

“We really tried to capture the ancient artefacts in a creative way, such as pearls and camel figurines.”

Virtual reality (VR) is also incorporated, with viewers taken on a journey with a group of traditional pearl divers, as well as a camel-back trek across the UAE’s Empty Quarter.

“We wanted to make a series of immersive VR experiences connected to the UAE’s history that would immerse the audience in places they’d never go to,” Geffen said.

The series also launched a children’s mobile app that “used the assets that we’d made during the creation of the series to give children a great way to engage with the past,” he added.


Saudi-led military committee moves heavy weapons outside Aden

Updated 25 January 2020

Saudi-led military committee moves heavy weapons outside Aden

  • The internationally recognized government and the separatist Southern Transitional Council are obliged to hand over their heavy weapons

AL-MUKALLA, Yemen: A military committee led by Saudi officers in Yemen has transported heavy weapons from bases in the southern port city of Aden, a committee member told Arab News on Friday. 

“We’ve moved tanks, cannons and ammunition from Aden military bases to a military outpost in Ras Abbas, on the outskirts of Aden,” said the member on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the press.

Under the Riyadh Agreement, the internationally recognized government and the separatist Southern Transitional Council are obliged to hand over their heavy weapons to the Saudi-led military committee, which is tasked with collecting them at a location outside Aden before dispatching them to battlefields. 

The committee is also charged with making other security and military arrangements, including the withdrawal of forces from the southern provinces of Shabwa and Abyan. 

The Riyadh Agreement, signed in the Saudi capital in November, was designed to defuse tensions between both sides following bloody clashes last year in Aden, Shabwa and Abyan. 

Residents in Aden reported seeing columns of lorries carrying tanks leaving military bases and heading to the city’s outskirts.

Despite failing to meet some deadlines included in the Riyadh Agreement, many of its terms have been implemented.

These include the return of the prime minister, the partial withdrawal of forces, an exchange of prisoners and the process of disarmament.

Following the relocation of military units, Yemen’s President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi is expected to appoint a new governor for Aden before forming a new government.

FASTFACT

Under the Riyadh Agreement, the internationally recognized government and the separatist Southern Transitional Council are obliged to hand over their heavy weapons to the Saudi-led military committee.

On the battlefield, heavy fighting continued on Friday in the Nehim district just outside Houthi-held Sanaa as government forces, backed by Saudi-led warplanes, pushed forward to pave the way for the liberation of the capital. Dozens have been killed since Wednesday as both sides claimed gains on the ground.

In Marib, senior army commanders on Friday said the army would keep pressing its offensive until the Houthis are expelled from Sanaa. 

At a meeting attended by the Saudi-led coalition commander in Marib, Maj. Gen. Abdul Hamed Al-Muzaini, Defense Minister Lt. Gen. Mohammed Ali Al-Maqdashi said the Yemeni Army is determined to push the Houthis out of Sanaa and other areas under their control, and to work on restoring state institutions. 

The commanders discussed military plans and the recent escalation of fighting in Nehim, Jouf and Marib.

The conflict in Yemen began in late 2014 when the Houthis seized Sanaa and began expanding across the country.

A military coalition led by Saudi Arabia has helped government forces advance on all fronts, pushing the Houthis to mountainous provinces in northern Yemen.