Outdoor advertising firm among best places to work in Saudi Arabia

Novo Nordisk Saudi was awarded the top position followed by GSK Saudi, a subsidiary of the global pharmaceutical company. (Supplied)
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Updated 10 December 2019

Outdoor advertising firm among best places to work in Saudi Arabia

  • The Best Places to Work HR survey includes 154 questions

LONDON: An outdoor advertising company has been named among the best places to work in Saudi Arabia.

Novo Nordisk Saudi was awarded the top position followed by GSK Saudi, a subsidiary of the global pharmaceutical company. Tamkeen Technologies a leading technology company came in the third position followed by AlArabia Contracting Services, a company offering the latest in outdoor advertising across the Kingdom. 

Best Places to Work program is an international program providing employers in different countries the opportunity to learn more about the engagement and satisfaction of their employees and celebrate companies whose employees feel connected to their workplace with exceptional human resources programs and forward-thinking workplace policies.

“The average level of engagement of the top 5 companies (80 percent) is something to be proud of, especially compared to the average of all the surveyed companies in Saudi Arabia. This is really an elite group, It’s the best of the best ” said Hamza Idrissi, program manager for Saudi Arabia.

Employers worldwide are increasingly monitoring workplace practices to ensure they are attracting the best candidates as employees look for higher salaries when switching jobs.

“Our employees are our greatest asset and we feel the investment we have made in them in paying off every day.” said Mohamed AlKhereiji general manager for AlArabia Contracting Services.


Google CEO calls for regulation of artificial intelligence

Updated 20 January 2020

Google CEO calls for regulation of artificial intelligence

  • Sundar Pichai’s comments come as lawmakers and governments seriously consider putting limits on how artificial intelligence is used
  • Pichai’s comments suggest the company may be hoping to head off a broad-based crackdown by the EU on the technology

LONDON: Google’s chief executive called Monday for a balanced approach to regulating artificial intelligence, telling a European audience that the technology brings benefits but also “negative consequences.”

Sundar Pichai’s comments come as lawmakers and governments seriously consider putting limits on how artificial intelligence is used.

“There is no question in my mind that artificial intelligence needs to be regulated. The question is how best to approach this,” Pichai said, according to a transcript of his speech at a Brussel-based think tank.

He noted that there’s an important role for governments to play and that as the European Union and the US start drawing up their own approaches to regulation, “international alignment” of any eventual rules will be critical. He did not provide specific proposals.

Pichai spoke on the same day he was scheduled to meet the EU’s powerful competition regulator, Margrethe Vestager.

Vestager has in previous years hit the Silicon Valley giant with multibillion-dollar fines for allegedly abusing its market dominance to choke off competition. After being reappointed for a second term last autumn with expanded powers over digital technology policies, Vestager has now set her sights on artificial intelligence, and is drawing up rules on its ethical use.

Pichai’s comments suggest the company may be hoping to head off a broad-based crackdown by the EU on the technology. Vestager and the EU have been the among the more aggressive regulators of big tech firms, an approach US authorities have picked up with investigations into the dominance of companies like Google, Facebook and Amazon.

“Sensible regulation must also take a proportionate approach, balancing potential harms with social opportunities,” he said, adding that it could incorporate existing standards like Europe’s tough General Data Protection Regulation rather than starting from scratch.

While it promises big benefits, he raised concerns about potential downsides of artificial intelligence, citing as one example its role in facial recognition technology, which can be used to find missing people but also for “nefarious reasons” which he didn’t specify.

In 2018, Google pledged not to use AI in applications related to weapons, surveillance that violates international norms, or that works in ways that go against human rights.