Outdoor advertising firm among best places to work in Saudi Arabia

Novo Nordisk Saudi was awarded the top position followed by GSK Saudi, a subsidiary of the global pharmaceutical company. (Supplied)
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Updated 10 December 2019

Outdoor advertising firm among best places to work in Saudi Arabia

  • The Best Places to Work HR survey includes 154 questions

LONDON: An outdoor advertising company has been named among the best places to work in Saudi Arabia.

Novo Nordisk Saudi was awarded the top position followed by GSK Saudi, a subsidiary of the global pharmaceutical company. Tamkeen Technologies a leading technology company came in the third position followed by AlArabia Contracting Services, a company offering the latest in outdoor advertising across the Kingdom. 

Best Places to Work program is an international program providing employers in different countries the opportunity to learn more about the engagement and satisfaction of their employees and celebrate companies whose employees feel connected to their workplace with exceptional human resources programs and forward-thinking workplace policies.

“The average level of engagement of the top 5 companies (80 percent) is something to be proud of, especially compared to the average of all the surveyed companies in Saudi Arabia. This is really an elite group, It’s the best of the best ” said Hamza Idrissi, program manager for Saudi Arabia.

Employers worldwide are increasingly monitoring workplace practices to ensure they are attracting the best candidates as employees look for higher salaries when switching jobs.

“Our employees are our greatest asset and we feel the investment we have made in them in paying off every day.” said Mohamed AlKhereiji general manager for AlArabia Contracting Services.


Expelled reporters leave China after headline row

Updated 24 February 2020

Expelled reporters leave China after headline row

  • The journalists work for the WSJ’s news section, which is not linked to the editorial and opinion pages

Two Wall Street Journal (WSJ) reporters left China on Monday after being expelled over a controversial headline in an op-ed that angered Beijing.

Three reporters were ordered out of the country last week over what Beijing deemed a racist headline that the journalists were not involved in writing — marking one of the harshest moves against foreign media in years.

But analysts noted that the decision to revoke their credentials came a day after Washington tightened rules on Chinese state media operating in the US — raising suspicion that Beijing had retaliated.

The WSJ opinion piece — headlined “China is the Real Sick Man of Asia” — was written by a US professor who criticized the Chinese government’s initial response to the coronavirus outbreak.

China’s foreign ministry said it was “racially discriminatory,” and as the newspaper wouldn’t apologize, the three reporters had their press cards revoked.

Deputy bureau chief Josh Chin and reporter Chao Deng, both US nationals, as well as reporter Philip Wen, an Australian, were given five days to leave the country, according to the Journal.

The journalists work for the WSJ’s news section, which is not linked to the editorial and opinion pages.

Decoder

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A letter from 53 WSJ reporters and editors called for the newspaper’s leadership to apologize, according to reports in the Washington Post, saying the headline was “derogatory.”

An AFP reporter saw Chin and Wen, wearing face masks, check in for their flight at Beijing’s main international airport and then pass through security.

Deng, the third journalist affected, had been reporting from Wuhan — the epicenter of the virus outbreak which has killed over 2,500 people.

The WSJ confirmed that she was still in the quarantined city.

The newspaper’s publisher said the outlet was “deeply disappointed” with China’s decision and that none of the journalists being expelled had “any involvement” with the opinion piece in question.

Decoder

Sick man of Asia

The phrase “sick man of Asia” originally referred to China in the late 19th and early 20th century, when it was exploited by foreign powers during a period sometimes called the country’s “century of humiliation.”