Gigi Hadid visits Senegalese women’s shelter

Gigi Hadid visited a supported shelter for women and girls who have been victims of abuse in Senegal
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Updated 10 December 2019

Gigi Hadid visits Senegalese women’s shelter

  • Her father came to the US as a refugee before he became a billionaire real estate developer
  • The 24-year-old documented her work with the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in Dakar on social media

DUBAI: American-Palestinian supermodel Gigi Hadid visited a support shelter for women and girls who have been victims of abuse in Senegal on Monday.  

The 24-year-old documented her work with the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in Dakar on social media.

“After being raped and/or impregnated from a sexual attack, it is common that these girls are shunned from their families and kicked out of their homes. Some women travel from very rural parts of the country, some even coming from other countries (one girl we met today is from Libya),” she wrote on Instagram.  

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Today we visited a @UNICEF supported shelter, for women and girl victims of abuse, in Dakar. After being raped and/or impregnated from a sexual attack, it is common that these girls are shunned from their families and kicked out of their homes. Some women travel from very rural parts of the country, some even coming from other countries (one girl we met today is from Libya). After traveling sometimes to many cities trying to find their ground, most girls learn about this home through word-of-mouth; no one will be turned down and they will be supported physically, emotionally, and psychologically here. Employees and volunteers of the shelter, lead by the founder Mona Chasserio and her colleague Danielle Hueges, shown in the photos, encourage the girls to share and find community through their hardship. They are taught to find the positive in their motherhood and relationship with their child, to love and care for them properly, and to nurture their passions, whether it be garment making, agriculture, sports, etc. and learn a skill set that will help them be able to enter the workplace upon their departure from the shelter. Not only have about 250 children been born in this shelter in the last 10 years (15 births have taken place between October and November of this year, and the youngest mother being only ten years old), but there are also orphans who are brought to this shelter by Senegal’s Ministry of Justice. Mothers and their children will stay at the shelter until it is agreed upon by themselves and the leaders that they have the confidence, strength, and skills they need to re-enter their communities, and orphans will stay til about 8 years old, when they are permitted by the government to enter a nursing home to be adopted. Their greatest tool is one called “Rapid Protection,” which is a 24/7 SMS system put in place by UNICEF that enables community members trained in child protection and this specific system (1,222 at this time to cover the 1.5 million people in this region) to be informants of abuse (physical, sexual, neglect, etc.) in their area. As soon as these cases have been reported through SMS, with the age and sex of the victim... (cont ↓)

A post shared by Gigi Hadid (@gigihadid) on

She shared a video and several images of girls and women at the camp, detailing the conditions they live in and UNICEF’s work in the area. “Employees and volunteers of the shelter … encourage the girls to share and find community through their hardship,” she wrote.

UNICEF has set up a tool called “Rapid Protection,” which is a messaging system that enables community members trained in child protection to be informants of abuse in their area, Hadid said.

The cause of the refugees is one that is close to Hadid’s heart. Her father, Mohamed Hadid, came to the US as a refugee before he became a billionaire real estate developer. Last year, she visited the Jamtoli refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, where she met with Rohingya refugee children.


Alternative music event MuseNight launches in Saudi Arabia

MuseNight, an offshoot of the indie label Museland, has showcased over 30 acts. (Supplied)
Updated 36 min 21 sec ago

Alternative music event MuseNight launches in Saudi Arabia

  • MuseNight makes its debut in Saudi Arabia on Friday, January 24 at the Bohemia Art Cafe in Alkhobar with an exciting lineup

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia has played host to some huge international acts over the past year or so as the Kingdom’s entertainment scene has opened up to live performances. But there haven’t been so many opportunities for alternative local or regional acts playing original material.

That could be about to change, as the Bahrain-based concert series MuseNight makes its debut in Saudi Arabia on Friday, January 24 at the Bohemia Art Cafe in Alkhobar with a lineup including Khaleeji electronic duo Arabesque, singer-songwriter Aveora and experimental electronic artist Hasan Hujairi. Entrance is free.

Over the past couple of years. MuseNight, an offshoot of the indie label Museland, has showcased over 30 acts — from solo artists to full bands to DJs — hailing from Bahrain, Saudi, Kuwait, UAE and from as far as the UK and Canada.

“With the incredible changes to the cultural and creative landscape happening in the Kingdom, we felt it was the right time to explore the alternative and independent scene with this concept,” Museland founder and creative director Ali Al-Saeed explained in a press release for the event.

Talking to Arab News about the roster for the night, Al-Saeed told Arab News, “We wanted to put a strong lineup that offers something fresh with their original music.”

Arabstract, he said, “have been gaining some momentum because they are venturing into a new musical landscape for the Bahrani alternative scene — they blend the best of both live performance and electronic music with a Khaleeji flavor.” Al-Saeed said Aveora’s music is “quite accessible, catchy but drenched in emotion. The performance is always powerful and impactful.”

And the Museland boss described Hujairi as “quite an enigma.”

“He is by far one of the most challenging artists working today,” Al-Saeed said. “Every performance he brings something different and unexpected, combining electronic music, sampling, programming and instrumentation.”

Al-Saeed hopes it will be the first in a series of shows in Saudi for MuseNight. “There’s a wealth of exceptional talent that is eager to evolve, and an audience that is just as eager to discover new music,” he said. “We’ve had a number of KSA-based bands performing in Bahrain with us, so we’re happy to have a few Bahraini acts performing in Saudi for the first time as well.”