Trump and Japan’s Abe spoke about North Korea

Trump and Japan’s Abe spoke about North Korea
White House spokesman said the two presidents agreed to continue close communication and coordination. (File/AFP)
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Updated 22 December 2019

Trump and Japan’s Abe spoke about North Korea

Trump and Japan’s Abe spoke about North Korea
  • US and Japan agree to continue cooperating, especially after recent threatening statements by North Korea
  • North Korea said the United States was trying to drag out denuclearization talks ahead of the US presidential election

WASHINGTON: US President Donald Trump spoke on Saturday with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe about developments related to North Korea, Iran, and trade, a White House spokesman said.
“President Trump and Prime Minister Abe agreed to continue close communication and coordination, particularly in light of recent threatening statements issued by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea,” White House spokesman Judd Deere said, referring to North Korea’s official name.
The call came after North Korea said the United States was trying to drag out denuclearization talks ahead of the US presidential election next year.


Kremlin says would welcome Biden’s efforts to extend New START arms control treaty

Kremlin says would welcome Biden’s efforts to extend New START arms control treaty
Updated 20 January 2021

Kremlin says would welcome Biden’s efforts to extend New START arms control treaty

Kremlin says would welcome Biden’s efforts to extend New START arms control treaty
  • The New START (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty) accord limits the numbers of strategic nuclear warheads
  • A failure to extend New START could fuel a potential arms race and tensions between Moscow and Washington

MOSCOW: The Kremlin said on Wednesday it remained committed to extending the New START nuclear arms control treaty with the United States and would welcome efforts promised by the administration of US President-elect Joe Biden to reach agreement.
The New START (Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty) accord, which was signed in 2010 and expires in February, limits the numbers of strategic nuclear warheads, missiles and bombers that Russia and the United States can deploy.
“Russia and its president are in favor of preserving this agreement,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters on a conference call. “If our American colleagues will in fact demonstrate a political will to preserve this pact by extending it, this can only be welcomed.”
Biden’s choice for secretary of state, Antony Blinken, said on Tuesday that the incoming US administration would seek to extend the pact and decide how long an extension to pursue.
Russian President Vladimir Putin last year called on Washington to extend the last major nuclear arms pact between the two countries for a year without any conditions.
A failure to extend New START could fuel a potential arms race and tensions between Moscow and Washington.