Synchronized Israeli attacks on Jordan, King Abdullah

Haaretz revealed that “Israel has big plans for Jordan, but they don’t include King Abdullah II.” (AFP)
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Updated 28 December 2019

Synchronized Israeli attacks on Jordan, King Abdullah

AMMAN: A series of anti-Jordanian articles appeared almost simultaneously in the Israeli media targeting Jordan and revealing deep Israeli anger and hatred for the Jordanian monarch. The articles appear to be based on a single source and they all reached the same conclusion. 

The independent daily Haaretz revealed that “Israel has big plans for Jordan, but they don’t include King Abdullah II.” The paper said that “a long list of articles by right-wing commentators, PR hacks for the government, were published over the past month in media (Caroline Glick in Israel Hayom, Aryeh Eldad in Maariv, Motti Karpel in Makor Rishon and others), raised similar arguments and identical conclusions.”

Smadar Perry a respected writer on Arab affairs for the widest circulating daily Yediot Aharonot told Arab News that Israelis are “divided and some are acting in a crazy way.” She said that while the anti-Jordan idea was born long before the latest anti-Israeli positions of Jordan, things are spinning out of control because of the elections. “These (anti-Jordan) ideas have been with us before, but because of the elections people will hear many crazy ideas.” Israel’s Herut party under former Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin, which represented the core of what is now the Israeli Likud party was famous for an expansionist slogan that said: “The Jordan has two banks; this one is our and the other one too.”

Perry told Arab News that the head of the Likud, Benjamin Netanyahu, only cares about himself. “Half of the Israelis don’t know what they want regarding Jordan, but they know they want Bibi (Netanyahu) and he is focused on the elections. He wants to win and he doesn’t care about Jordan.” Perry said that only the military people are doing their job and are trying to make some sense in Israeli foreign policy.

Anees Sweidan, director of the Arab Affairs Department in the PLO, told Arab News that Palestine and Jordan are one in all political issues. “The incitement against Jordan reflects the chaos that Israel under the corrupt Netanyahu is experiencing.” Sweidan said that Jordan is being made to pay the political price for its consistent support to Palestine and rejection of the Israeli attempts to annex the Jordan Valley.”

Hani Al-Masri, director general of the Masarat think tank in Ramallah, told Arab News that there are multiple reasons for the Israeli attacks on Jordan. “It is connected to Jordan’s recent statements and falls within the anti-Arab one-upmanship that has become the hallmark of Israeli elections both internal and national.” AlMasri said that Jordan’s strong opposition to the Israeli annexation plans is denying right-wing Israelis their dream” that Jordan will one day become Palestine.”

Monjed Jado, publisher of the Palestine News Network and an observer of the Israeli political scene, told Arab News that right-wing Israelis are angry. “They were angry with the insistence of Jordan to have the two enclaves returned, but they were disappointed with the Americans whom they expected to put pressure on the King to be more supportive of Israel’s desires.”


Aid group warns that 700,000 children in Syria risk hunger

Updated 29 September 2020

Aid group warns that 700,000 children in Syria risk hunger

  • Save the Children said the new figures mean that in the last six months
  • After nearly a 10-year conflict that killed some 400,000 and displaced half the country’s population
BEIRUT: An additional 700,000 children in Syria face hunger because of the country’s badly damaged economy and the impact of coronavirus restrictions, an international aid group warned Tuesday.
Save the Children said the new figures mean that in the last six months, the total number of food-insecure children across the country has risen to more than 4.6 million.
After nearly a 10-year conflict that killed some 400,000 and displaced half the country’s population, Syria’s economy has been badly harmed by the war as well as by widespread corruption, Western sanctions and a severe economic and financial crisis in neighboring Lebanon.
The local currency crashed in recent months making it more difficult for many Syrians to buy food. The spread of coronavirus in the war-torn country has worsened the situation.
Save the Children said an unprecedented number of children in Syria are now battling soaring malnutrition rates.
A recent survey conducted by Save the Children found that 65% of children “have not had an apple, an orange, or a banana for at least three months.” In northeast Syria, an area controlled by the US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces, almost a quarter of children said they had not eaten those fruit in at least nine months, according to Save the Children.
Save the Children said parents have little choice but to cut out fresh food such as meat, fruit, and vegetables, relying instead on rice or grains for weeks.
The aid group said one mother said she saved up for three weeks to buy a single apple, which she split five ways between her and her family. It said at least one in eight children in Syria currently suffer lifelong risks for children, including stunting or chronic malnutrition.
“A whole generation of children are facing the risk of malnutrition because their families simply can no longer afford to put a meal on the table,” said Save the Children’s Syria Response Director, Sonia Khush.
The Syrian government has registered more than 4,100 cases of coronavirus in areas under its control while there are scores of cases in the last rebel stronghold in the country’s northwest and eastern Syria that is controlled by US-backed Kurdish-led fighters.
The numbers of cases are believed to be much higher as many Syrians in rural areas don’t know that they are carrying the virus.
Coronavirus tests at private clinics cost around $60, far too expensive for most Syrians, whose average salary is less than $100 a month. The government conducts about 300 free tests each day for people showing symptoms.
Save the Children will be distributing food parcels with fresh fruit and vegetables in northern Syria, targeting pregnant women and new mothers, to combat hidden hunger in children and mothers. The international humanitarian organization also supports young children across Syria, providing dietary advice, and screening for malnutrition.
In July, Russia forced the UN Security Council to limit humanitarian aid deliveries to the country’s mainly rebel-held northwest to just one crossing point from Turkey. Western nations at the time said the move will cut a lifeline for 1.3 million people.
Save the Children also called for unrestricted humanitarian access and the reauthorization of border crossings.