Question reality at Dubai’s wacky new ‘trick-art’ museum

3D World Dubai contains more than 185 paintings all of which are illusions. (Arab News)
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Updated 29 December 2019

Question reality at Dubai’s wacky new ‘trick-art’ museum

  • 3D World Dubai contains more than 185 paintings all of which are illusions
  • It took 18 artists six months to produce the images, according to the owner

DUBAI: A new museum in Dubai invites visitors to explore the world of ‘trick art’ or 3D art.

3D World Dubai, which opened on December 12, contains more than 185 paintings all of which are illusions. According to co-founder Schakun Singh, it is the world’s largest 3D art museum. “We have a total area of 23,000 square feet, and as far as the number of artworks is concerned, we can say very comfortably that we have the largest museum in the world,” Singh told Arab News.

She explained that 3D art originated in France in the 1800s, using a technique called ‘trompe-l'oeil,’ which translates as ‘deceive the eye.’  

 “This technique turns two-dimensional paintings into three-dimensional images through the use of optical illusions,” Singh said.




(Arab News)

Singh and her husband, Ramman Ticku, were inspired to open the museum after visiting a similar establishment while on holiday.

“We visited one such museum with our then-seven-year-old child,” she said. “We all had so much fun as a family; we were engaged and active.

“We then started to research museums in other countries and found that it was a successful business model. We wanted to bring this here and for Dubai to have the first one in the region.”




(Arab News)

3D World Dubai is based around nine themes (to add “a sense of adventure, mystery and fantasy,” Singh said): Illusion, Egypt, Water World, Animal Kingdom, World of Classics, Fantasy, Jungle, Humor, and the Arabic Zone (“essential to showcase the UAE and Dubai,” she explained). Singh said ‘Egypt’ is her personal favorite: “You’ve got the pyramids and the flying carpet; there is lots of interaction there,” she said.

It took 18 artists six months to produce the images, according to Singh. “The process includes choosing the artwork, designing and fine tuning on the computer, sketching and projecting the outline on the walls and finally painting,” she said. “Each artists was specialized In their own field.”




(Arab News)

Singh and Ticku traveled extensively, searching out the best artists and visiting other 3D art museums in Thailand, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan and the Philippines.

Financing was a major challenge. “We saved and saved and then we fell back on family and then the bank,” Singh said. Now the project is finished, the couple — who run a tourism company — are focused on marketing the museum to residents and visitors alike. Singh said they plan to create a franchise model to enable them to open in other countries in the region in future.

The main draw of the museum, Singh believes, is that it can “bring the entire family together in one place.”

It’s been a long and expensive journey for the couple, but Singh said she would advise all aspiring entrepreneurs to stick with their dreams.

“If a thought or idea gives you sleepless nights and consumes you, it is worth chasing that dream. There will be delays and road blocks but don’t give up,” she said. “Nothing can replace hard work, so work hard.”


Georges Chakra politicizes couture in an ode to Lebanon

Georges Chakra continuously unveils his aesthetic concepts through his couture shows during fashion weeks. (Supplied)
Updated 21 January 2020

Georges Chakra politicizes couture in an ode to Lebanon

  • The 47-piece offering was an extravagant ode to the Beirut-born designer’s home country of Lebanon, where nation-wide protests have been ongoing for the past couple of months

PARIS: Lebanese Georges Chakra presented his Spring 2020 couture collection at Paris’ Petit Palace on Monday. The 47-piece offering was an extravagant ode to the Beirut-born designer’s home country of Lebanon, where nation-wide protests have been ongoing for the past couple of months.

Lebanese Georges Chakra presented his Spring 2020 couture collection at Paris’ Petit Palace. (Supplied)

Placed on each of the guest’s seats along with the show notes was a synthetic white rose accompanied by a note that read “un rose pour la liberte,” which translates to “one rose for freedom.”

Placed on each of the guest’s seats along with the show notes was a synthetic white rose which read “one rose for freedom.” (Supplied)

The message? Fashion is an act of resistance. Chakra wanted to create the real-life looks that reflected the sophisticated and rebellious nature of Lebanese women. These included a show-stopping lineup of striking eveningwear in a burst of white, hot pink and blue color palettes.

Chakra’s brand signature combines elaborate and intricate back details coupled with modern and bold fabrics. (Supplied)

The glimmer-creating Japanese app Kirakira, which turns anything sparkly into a disco ball–like reflection of shine and shimmer, was the preferred medium for capturing Chakra’s runway today — and rightly so. There were plenty of crystal and sequin embellished pieces on the runway that will surely hit the red carpet soon. 

There were plenty of crystal and sequin embellished pieces on the runway that will surely hit the red carpet soon. (Supplied)

Standout looks included a pink, strapless satin duchesse dress that was short at the front and long at the back and boasted a violet floral print, an asymmetrical gown that featured dashes of sequins in varying hues of green, an icy blue sheath dress with an organza train and a hand-painted blue-grey gazar dress with a fan shaped neckline.

Chakra wanted to create the real-life looks that reflected the sophisticated and rebellious nature of Lebanese women. (Supplied)

You can picture his longtime client US actress Janina Gavankar looking devastating on the red carpet wearing the bright pink slit dress with a criss-cross neckline and long train. Or his new client, actress Nina Kiri, who wore one of his creations to the 2020 Screen Actors Guild Awards on Jan. 20, in the strapless, aquamarine satin dress with a high slit.

Chakra began his work in a war-clad Beirut, after he graduated from Canada. (Supplied)

As is customary, the last look was the bridal look. The off-the-shoulder wedding dress was accessorized with a glittering emerald and diamond necklace made by Lebanese jeweler Fawaz Gruosi. In addition to the striking sartorial lineup, the necklace will also be available for purchase, with a portion of the proceeds going to Beirut’s Children's Cancer Center of Lebanon and scholarships at the Ecole Saint Vincent de Paul.