Art exhibition marries Egyptian and Saudi ‘Faces and Places’

Ismat Dawstashi opening his exhibition — ‘Faces and Places’ — which showcases the works of over 60 artists, both Egyptian and Saudi Arabian. (AN photo)
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Updated 09 January 2020

Art exhibition marries Egyptian and Saudi ‘Faces and Places’

  • ‘Faces and Places’ houses the work of over 60 artists, both Egyptian and Saudi Arabian
  • The exhibition is located in the Giza suburb of Cairo, and is the result of a three-week workshop held at the gallery

CAIRO: Dai Gallery is currently hosting “Faces and Places,” a fine arts exhibition, which showcases the works of a number of talented artists from Egypt and Saudi Arabia.

The exhibition is located in the Giza suburb of Cairo, and is the result of a three-week workshop held at the gallery.

“Faces and Places” houses the work of over 60 artists, both Egyptian and Saudi Arabian.

It is part of Ismat Dawstashi’s launch of his book “Portrait.” Dawstashi worked as a director for the Ministry of Culture in Egypt, as well as in the museum of Mahmoud Said, one of Egypt’s finest 20th century artists. 

Dawstashi studied at the School of Fine Arts in Alexandria, and his work has been showcased in various locations across the Middle East and in Europe.

Dawstashi gave himself the title “Enlightened Dada,” since his surrealist work took inspiration from the early 20th century art movement. Dawstashi’s “Portrait” tackles the issue of the self-portrait and contains over 150 studies of Dawstashi himself, drawn by other artists.

The exhibition lasts three weeks following opening night on Dec. 28.

Talal Zahid, a major sponsor of Saudi and Egyptian fine arts, said the launching of the book was seen as an opportunity to bring together artists of different backgrounds and cultures to exchange experiences, and strengthen the relationship between both nations.

Zahid explained that when a large number of artists are involved in such a project, a competitive spirit is born which pushes each artist to deliver his or her best work.

The exhibition showcases a merging between two cultures. The Saudi artists were inspired by the environment they lived in, and hence delivered works that married both cultures into one.

Artists who took part in the exhibition include Ebada El-Zohairy, Khaled Ameer, Taher Abdel-Azeem and Yara Hassan.

“The pioneering artist Ismat Dawstashi believed that faces just get more beautiful every time we look at them,” Hisham Kandil, chairman of the board of directors of Arab Atelier of Culture and Arts at Dai Gallery, said.


Georges Chakra politicizes couture in an ode to Lebanon

Georges Chakra continuously unveils his aesthetic concepts through his couture shows during fashion weeks. (Supplied)
Updated 21 January 2020

Georges Chakra politicizes couture in an ode to Lebanon

  • The 47-piece offering was an extravagant ode to the Beirut-born designer’s home country of Lebanon, where nation-wide protests have been ongoing for the past couple of months

PARIS: Lebanese Georges Chakra presented his Spring 2020 couture collection at Paris’ Petit Palace on Monday. The 47-piece offering was an extravagant ode to the Beirut-born designer’s home country of Lebanon, where nation-wide protests have been ongoing for the past couple of months.

Lebanese Georges Chakra presented his Spring 2020 couture collection at Paris’ Petit Palace. (Supplied)

Placed on each of the guest’s seats along with the show notes was a synthetic white rose accompanied by a note that read “un rose pour la liberte,” which translates to “one rose for freedom.”

Placed on each of the guest’s seats along with the show notes was a synthetic white rose which read “one rose for freedom.” (Supplied)

The message? Fashion is an act of resistance. Chakra wanted to create the real-life looks that reflected the sophisticated and rebellious nature of Lebanese women. These included a show-stopping lineup of striking eveningwear in a burst of white, hot pink and blue color palettes.

Chakra’s brand signature combines elaborate and intricate back details coupled with modern and bold fabrics. (Supplied)

The glimmer-creating Japanese app Kirakira, which turns anything sparkly into a disco ball–like reflection of shine and shimmer, was the preferred medium for capturing Chakra’s runway today — and rightly so. There were plenty of crystal and sequin embellished pieces on the runway that will surely hit the red carpet soon. 

There were plenty of crystal and sequin embellished pieces on the runway that will surely hit the red carpet soon. (Supplied)

Standout looks included a pink, strapless satin duchesse dress that was short at the front and long at the back and boasted a violet floral print, an asymmetrical gown that featured dashes of sequins in varying hues of green, an icy blue sheath dress with an organza train and a hand-painted blue-grey gazar dress with a fan shaped neckline.

Chakra wanted to create the real-life looks that reflected the sophisticated and rebellious nature of Lebanese women. (Supplied)

You can picture his longtime client US actress Janina Gavankar looking devastating on the red carpet wearing the bright pink slit dress with a criss-cross neckline and long train. Or his new client, actress Nina Kiri, who wore one of his creations to the 2020 Screen Actors Guild Awards on Jan. 20, in the strapless, aquamarine satin dress with a high slit.

Chakra began his work in a war-clad Beirut, after he graduated from Canada. (Supplied)

As is customary, the last look was the bridal look. The off-the-shoulder wedding dress was accessorized with a glittering emerald and diamond necklace made by Lebanese jeweler Fawaz Gruosi. In addition to the striking sartorial lineup, the necklace will also be available for purchase, with a portion of the proceeds going to Beirut’s Children's Cancer Center of Lebanon and scholarships at the Ecole Saint Vincent de Paul.