Art exhibition marries Egyptian and Saudi ‘Faces and Places’

Ismat Dawstashi opening his exhibition — ‘Faces and Places’ — which showcases the works of over 60 artists, both Egyptian and Saudi Arabian. (AN photo)
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Updated 09 January 2020

Art exhibition marries Egyptian and Saudi ‘Faces and Places’

  • ‘Faces and Places’ houses the work of over 60 artists, both Egyptian and Saudi Arabian
  • The exhibition is located in the Giza suburb of Cairo, and is the result of a three-week workshop held at the gallery

CAIRO: Dai Gallery is currently hosting “Faces and Places,” a fine arts exhibition, which showcases the works of a number of talented artists from Egypt and Saudi Arabia.

The exhibition is located in the Giza suburb of Cairo, and is the result of a three-week workshop held at the gallery.

“Faces and Places” houses the work of over 60 artists, both Egyptian and Saudi Arabian.

It is part of Ismat Dawstashi’s launch of his book “Portrait.” Dawstashi worked as a director for the Ministry of Culture in Egypt, as well as in the museum of Mahmoud Said, one of Egypt’s finest 20th century artists. 

Dawstashi studied at the School of Fine Arts in Alexandria, and his work has been showcased in various locations across the Middle East and in Europe.

Dawstashi gave himself the title “Enlightened Dada,” since his surrealist work took inspiration from the early 20th century art movement. Dawstashi’s “Portrait” tackles the issue of the self-portrait and contains over 150 studies of Dawstashi himself, drawn by other artists.

The exhibition lasts three weeks following opening night on Dec. 28.

Talal Zahid, a major sponsor of Saudi and Egyptian fine arts, said the launching of the book was seen as an opportunity to bring together artists of different backgrounds and cultures to exchange experiences, and strengthen the relationship between both nations.

Zahid explained that when a large number of artists are involved in such a project, a competitive spirit is born which pushes each artist to deliver his or her best work.

The exhibition showcases a merging between two cultures. The Saudi artists were inspired by the environment they lived in, and hence delivered works that married both cultures into one.

Artists who took part in the exhibition include Ebada El-Zohairy, Khaled Ameer, Taher Abdel-Azeem and Yara Hassan.

“The pioneering artist Ismat Dawstashi believed that faces just get more beautiful every time we look at them,” Hisham Kandil, chairman of the board of directors of Arab Atelier of Culture and Arts at Dai Gallery, said.


Britain’s Banksy depicts US flag on fire in George Floyd tribute

Updated 06 June 2020

Britain’s Banksy depicts US flag on fire in George Floyd tribute

  • Banksy likened racism to a broken pipe flooding a downstairs apartment
  • Banksy frequently chooses topical themes for his artworks

LONDON: Reclusive British street artist Banksy published a new artwork online on Saturday which depicts the United States flag being set alight by a candle that forms part of a memorial to an anonymous, black, silhouetted figure.
The artwork appeared as thousands of people gathered in London and other cities around the world to protest the May 25 killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, where a white police officer detaining him knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes.
"People of colour are being failed by the system. The white system," Banksy wrote in a short statement that accompanied the image on the social media platform Instagram.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Banksy (@banksy) on

Banksy likened racism to a broken pipe flooding a downstairs apartment, and said the downstairs occupants would be entitled to break into the apartment upstairs to fix the problem.
"This is a white problem. And if white people don't fix it, someone will have to come upstairs and kick the door in," Banksy wrote alongside the image.
Banksy frequently chooses topical themes for his artworks, which are normally stencilled on walls.
Last month, he showed a young boy choosing a nurse as the superhero he wants to play with over Batman and Spiderman, in a new artwork to encapsulate the gratitude Britons have felt toward the country's National Health Service during the coronavirus crisis.