Dubai’s DP World wins ruling against Djibouti over seized port

DP World, which is majority-owned by the Dubai government in the United Arab Emirates, operates nearly 80 marine and inland terminals around the world. (AFP)
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Updated 14 January 2020

Dubai’s DP World wins ruling against Djibouti over seized port

  • London tribunal ordered Djibouti to restore its rights and benefits under a 2006 concession agreement
  • DP World operates nearly 80 marine and inland terminals around the world

DUBAI: DP World said Tuesday it has won another arbitration ruling against Djibouti over the African country’s seizure of a container terminal managed by the Dubai-based global port operator.
The company said a London tribunal ordered Djibouti to restore its rights and benefits under a 2006 concession agreement governing the Doraleh port within two months or pay damages. DP World estimates it has lost $1 billion since Djibouti took over the terminal in February 2018.
DP World, which is majority-owned by the Dubai government in the United Arab Emirates, operates nearly 80 marine and inland terminals around the world.
Djibouti seized the container terminal after DP World created another corridor for imports to landlocked Ethiopia in Somaliland, endangering Djibouti’s near-monopoly on Ethiopia’s imports.
Ethiopia recently became a 19 percent shareholder in Somaliland’s Berbera port, where DP World holds a 51 percent stake. Somaliland, a breakaway northern region of Somalia, holds the remaining 30 percent.
The expansion into Somaliland came alongside plans by the United Arab Emirates to build a naval base in Berbera, part of its expanding military presence in the region.
Djibouti’s port alone accounts for 95 percent of Ethiopia’s imports. With a population of 110 million people, Ethiopia is the largest economy in the Horn of Africa.
DP World said the tribunal ruled that Djibouti broke the law when it removed the company from management of the terminal and transferred the terminal’s assets to a state-run company. The Dubai-based company said Djibouti has ignored five previous rulings in its favor despite the fact that the contract is governed by English law.


UK lends $22bn to small firms hit by coronavirus

Updated 27 May 2020

UK lends $22bn to small firms hit by coronavirus

  • The finance ministry offers banks a 100% credit guarantee on loans of up to $61,479
  • The money was lent to 608,069 small businesses as of May 24

LONDON: British small businesses have borrowed more than $22 billion under a government-guaranteed coronavirus credit program during its first three weeks of operation, outpacing bank lending under other schemes for bigger firms.
The finance ministry offers banks a 100% credit guarantee on loans of up to 50,000 pounds under its Bounce Back Loan Scheme, after an 80% guarantee slowed lending under an earlier program.
The BBLS has lent $22.74 billion to 608,069 small businesses as of May 24, up from $17.36 billion by May 17.
By contrast an earlier program that lends up to 5 million pounds, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, has only lent $10 billion since its launch in March.
Banks have approved about half of loan applications under CBILS so far, compared with 79% for the BBLS.
Finance minister Rishi Sunak initially opposed offering full state guarantees for bank lending, due partly to the risk of bad debts, but allowed it for the smallest firms after pressure from business groups, legislators and the Bank of England.