British-Lebanese influencer Carol Hannoun looks back at Paris Couture Week

The trend-setter shared what it’s really like to get caught up in the madness of fashion week. (Instagram)
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Updated 24 January 2020

British-Lebanese influencer Carol Hannoun looks back at Paris Couture Week

DUBAI: We caught up with the British-Lebanese fashion influencer Carol Hannoun, who was spotted dashing around the streets of the French capital for Paris Couture Week. The trend-setter shared what it’s really like to get caught up in the madness of fashion week.

Hannoun’s day at Paris Couture Week starts off “very” early. She gets her hair and make-up done and hits the road to take a few shots of her look while the sun shines on her put-together looks.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Black is the new Black! On my way to @zuhairmuradofficial Photo Credits: @zackary.art @humanagementme

A post shared by CAROL HANNOUN (@carolhannoun) on

“After the morning shows I rush back to my hotel, grab a quick bite if possible and change into my second look of the day,” Hannoun told Arab News. “Once all my shows and presentations are done, I like to change into something comfortable and have a cozy dinner with my friends.”

The blogger said she looks forward to attending Lebanese designer Zuhair Murad’s shows. “I personally think his designs are always so elegant, strong, sexy and feminine at the same time,” she explained.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The world is your runway! Photo Credits: @zackary.art @humanagementme #parisfashionweek #pariscoutureweek

A post shared by CAROL HANNOUN (@carolhannoun) on

This year, Hannoun said she wanted to support and showcase some up and coming “Lebanese designers and Lebanese stores who are so talented.”

According to the style icon, Arab designers stand out from western designers at Paris Couture Week because they understand the ways in which “Arab women like to flatter their figures.” “Lately we have been witnessing Arab designers dominating the red carpets in Hollywood and that says a lot,” she added.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Something Blue Photo Credits: @zackary.art @humanagementme #pariscoutureweek #parisfashionweek

A post shared by CAROL HANNOUN (@carolhannoun) on

Hannoun, who is also an image consultant, grew up and studied in London. She received a degree in communication and training in fashion, design and shopping at the London College of Fashion, which has given her all she needs to pursue this career.


Indian label Two Point Two makes catwalk debut at LFW

Founder of Two Point Two Anvita Sharma presented her first catwalk show outside of India this week. (Supplied)
Updated 22 min 36 sec ago

Indian label Two Point Two makes catwalk debut at LFW

LONDON: “Two Point Two is a genderless, anti-conformist, all-inclusive brand. We don’t cater to any particular gender or any particular size,” declared designer Anvita Sharma at London Fashion Week’s Fashion Scout.

Some might say packing all that into a dress is a pretty big challenge, but this is something she clearly believes in.

This is Two Point Two’s first runway show outside India. (Supplied)

“We believe in diversity, independence and confidence and we support individuals who want to be as loud or mellow as possible. So we have a huge variety of colors, silhouettes and details,” she said.

Sharma, who studied at Istituto Marangoni in Milan and Paris, is a rising talent. Last year she won the third edition of “Scouting for India,” a global project developed by Vogue Talents in collaboration with FAD International Academy and FAD Institute of Luxury Fashion & Style.

The collection used wool and wool felt, shot cotton and wool and some Giza cottons for the shirts and dresses. (Supplied)

Her win included the opportunity to showcase her Spring/Summer 2020 collection at the Palazzo Cusani within the exhibition celebrating Vogue Talent’s 10th anniversary during Milan Fashion Week.

This week, amid the hectic backstage preparations for her Fashion Scout showing, she found the time to talk to Arab News, running us through her color palette and fabrics.

“We have a mix of neutrals and pastels as well as vibrant reds. Some shades are often categorized as either feminine or masculine, so we want to amalgamate both of them to say that colors are not supposed to be associated with any particular gender, color or race,” she explained.

The color palette was a mix of neutrals and pastels as well as vibrant reds. (Supplied)

“For fabrics, we have mostly used wool and wool felt, shot cotton and wool and some Giza cottons for the shirts and dresses. We have also done a lot of hand embroidery. One coat took four weeks to hand embroider,” she said.

The production for Two Point Two is based in Delhi.

For her next collection, Sharma is going to work with craft clusters of Indian women weavers based in the mountain city of Kullu, capital of the Kullu district in the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh.

She has a track record of being supportive of hand crafts — evident in her previous collections.

The production for Two Point Two is based in Delhi. (Supplied)

“Last season, we did handwoven fabrics of cotton and silk from another region in India. Now Two Point Two wants to bring different, dying crafts of India to an international audience,” she explained.

Commenting on her increasingly high profile, she said: “It’s very frantic and because I’m a perfectionist it really gets to me at times. I am happy to be here because it is London Fashion Week. This is our first runway show outside India — so we are very excited.”