WEEKLY ENERGY RECAP: Crude oil prices deteriorated sharply

WEEKLY ENERGY RECAP: Crude oil prices deteriorated sharply
Because of copious US shale oil supplies, the West African crude oil market continues to struggle with the ripple effects of the Atlantic basin being awash in crude oil availability. (File/AP)
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Updated 26 January 2020

WEEKLY ENERGY RECAP: Crude oil prices deteriorated sharply

WEEKLY ENERGY RECAP: Crude oil prices deteriorated sharply

Crude oil prices deteriorated sharply over the week, with Brent crude falling to $60.69 per barrel, the lowest in nearly two months. 

WTI dropped to $54.19 per barrel the lowest since October 2019. Pessimism seems to be back after fears that China’s coronavirus outbreak may dent crude oil demand. Still, China crude oil imports are increasing and the crude price encourages more buying to build up Chinese inventories.

Libyan supply interruptions are also affecting the market, where a similar type of light sweet oil to West African crude is made.

Traders have largely ignored Libyan supply issues because the market has become used to supply outages since 2011.

West African crude oil has usually stepped in to the fill the gap in European and the Mediterranean markets. At the same time the US shale oil revolution of the last six years has meant that less of this type of crude from West Africa has been sent to the US.

If the Libyan oil was a medium sour crude grade like the Arabian Gulf crude oil grades, the market situation would be different as this type of oil cannot be easily replaced.

Because of copious US shale oil supplies, the West African crude oil market continues to struggle with the ripple effects of the Atlantic basin being awash in crude oil availability. 

Over the longer term, prospects look bleak for European refinvers and Nigerian crude sales by implication. 

Big new refineries in Asia are posing stronger competition to Europe’s products market, as are US oil product exports which have been made cheaper and more plentiful by the growth of shale oil. Noticeably, shale oil has already displaced West African barrels from the US market. 

Today, the marginal barrel of crude oil has become extremely light, starving sophisticated refiners of heavy crude oil and thereby narrowing light/heavy differentials. 

This has meant heavier crude grades have been outperforming lighter sweet crude grades in recent years, so the loss of Libyan crude did not have a major impact.


IMF chief sees ‘high degree of uncertainty’ in global outlook

IMF chief sees ‘high degree of uncertainty’ in global outlook
Updated 1 min 28 sec ago

IMF chief sees ‘high degree of uncertainty’ in global outlook

IMF chief sees ‘high degree of uncertainty’ in global outlook
  • IMF had rapidly increased concessional financing to emerging market and developing economies

WASHINGTON: The head of the International Monetary Fund on Monday said the global lender needed more resources to help heavily indebted countries, citing a highly uncertain global economic outlook and a growing divergence between rich and poor countries.
IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva, who has long advocated a new allocation of the IMF’s own currency, Special Drawing Rights (SDRs), said doing so now would give more funds to use address both the health and economic crisis, and accelerate moves to a digital and green economy.
Under outgoing President Donald Trump, the United States, the IMF’s largest shareholder, has blocked such a new SDR allocation, a move akin to a central bank printing money, since it would provide more resources to richer countries since the allocation would be proportionate to their shareholding.
Swedish Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson, the new chair of the IMF’s steering committee speaking at an online news conference with Georgieva, said it was clear the need for liquidity remained great, and she would consult with member countries on options for expanding liquidity.
Andersson, the first European to head the International Monetary and Financial Committee in more than 12 years and the first women, started her three-year term in the role on Monday.
Georgieva said the IMF had rapidly increased concessional financing to emerging market and developing economies, including through donations by member countries of some $20 billion in existing SDRs. That would continue to play an important role, but further steps were needed, she said.
“It will continue to be so important, even more important, for us to be able to expand our capacity to support countries that have fallen behind,” Georgieva said.
She said a new SDR allocation had never been taken off the table by IMF members, she said, adding that some members continued to discuss it as a possible move. A possible sale of gold from the IMF’s reserves would have “some opportunity costs” for the IMF, but would be up to members, she said.
She said she expected the Group of 20 major economies to extend the current moratorium in official debt service payments by the poorest countries, now slated to end in June, but much would depend on the pace of vaccinations in coming months.