Dubai port operator DP World suspends staff travel to China

DP World currently operates at three ports in mainland China, as well as another in Hong Kong. (Reuters )
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Updated 29 January 2020

Dubai port operator DP World suspends staff travel to China

  • DP World’s website shows it operates at three ports in mainland China and at another port in Hong Kong

DUBAI: DP World, one of the world’s largest port operators, has suspended all staff travel to China until further notice due to the  Wuhan coronavirus outbreak.

Companies including Facebook, LG Electronics and Standard Chartered are among those restricting travel for employees to China, where the death toll from a flu-like virus rose above 100 on Tuesday.

“All travel to China is suspended until further notice, unless for emergency purposes. We continue to monitor World Health Organization and government advice,” a spokesman at DP World told Reuters on Tuesday.

DP World’s website shows it operates at three ports in mainland China and at another port in Hong Kong.

Chinese nationals, however, would be permitted to travel back to China if they needed to go home, the spokesman added.

“All our ports are complying with the official government health ministry directive for operations, staff health precautions and risk mitigation plans,” he said, adding that ports need to continue to operate for welfare and health purposes, including the import of food and medicine.

Dubai’s Emirates airline has advised its flight crew to stay in their hotels when on a layover in China due to the coronavirus, an internal notice seen by Reuters showed.

The US has warned against travel to China, where the coronavirus outbreak has left millions of Chinese stranded during the country’s biggest holiday of the year. 


Bailout will keep Air France-KLM afloat for less than year: CEO

Updated 21 September 2020

Bailout will keep Air France-KLM afloat for less than year: CEO

  • ‘If we base it upon the past few weeks, it is clear that the recovery in traffic will be slower than expected’
  • Governments are coming under pressure to tie airline bailouts to environmental commitments

PARIS: Bailouts provided to Air France-KLM by the French and Dutch governments will keep the airline flying less than a year, its CEO Benjamin Smith said Monday and evoked the possibility of injecting new capital.
In an interview with the French daily l’Opinion, Smith also warned that calls for airlines to contribute more to fight climate change could be catastrophic for their survival which is already under threat due to the coronavirus pandemic.
When countries imposed lockdowns earlier this year to stem the spread of the coronavirus airlines faced steep drops in revenue that have claimed several carriers.
A number of countries stepped in with support, including France which provided $8.2 billion to Air France and the Netherlands which received a $2.9 billion package.
“This support will permit us to hold on less than 12 months,” said Smith.
The reason is that air traffic is picking up very slowly as many northern hemisphere countries are now fearing a second wave of infections.
“If we base it upon the past few weeks, it is clear that the recovery in traffic will be slower than expected,” according to Smith, who said when the bailout was put together the airline was expecting a return to 2019 levels only in 2024.
Smith said discussions were already underway with shareholders on shoring up the airline group, and steps would be taken before the next regular annual meeting in the second quarter of next year.
“One, three or five billion euros? It is too early to put a figure on a possible recapitalization,” he said.
The airline group had $12.12 billion in cash or available under credit lines.
Major shareholders include the French government with a 14.3 percent stake, the Dutch government at 14 percent, as well as Delta and China Eastern airlines which each hold an 8 percent stake.
Governments are coming under pressure to tie airline bailouts to environmental commitments.
One proposal that has come from a citizen’s convention convoked by President Emmanuel Macron would cost airlines an estimated $3.6 billion.
Smith said the imposition of environmental charges on the industry would be “irresponsible and catastrophic” for Air France-KLM.