What We Are Reading Today: Never Enough by Judith Grisel

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Updated 10 February 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Never Enough by Judith Grisel

Addiction is epidemic and catastrophic. With more than one in every five people over the age of 14 addicted, drug abuse has been called the most formidable health problem worldwide.

If we are not victims ourselves, we all know someone struggling with the merciless compulsion to alter their experience by changing how their brain functions.

Drawing on years of research — as well as personal experience as a recovered addict — researcher and professor Judy Grisel has reached a fundamental conclusion: For the addict, there will never be enough drugs.

In this book, Grisel shows how different drugs act on the brain, the kind of experiential effects they generate, and the specific reasons why each is so hard to kick, according to a review published on goodreads.com.

Grisel’s insights lead to a better understanding of the brain’s critical contributions to addictive behavior.


What We Are Reading Today: The Boys In The Boat by Daniel James Brown

Updated 26 February 2020

What We Are Reading Today: The Boys In The Boat by Daniel James Brown

Daniel James Brown’s robust book tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal, a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans.

The sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the boys defeated elite rivals first from eastern and British universities and finally the German crew rowing for Adolf Hitler in the Olympic games in Berlin, 1936.

The emotional heart of the story lies with one rower, Joe Rantz, a teenager without family or prospects, who rows not for glory, but to regain his shattered self-regard and to find a place he can call home.

Drawing on the boys’ own diaries and journals, their photos and memories of a once-in-a-lifetime shared dream, “The Boys in the Boat” is an irresistible story about beating the odds and finding hope in the most desperate of times, according to a review published on goodreads.com.

It will appeal to readers of Erik Larson, Timothy Egan, James Bradley, and David Halberstam’s “The Amateurs.”