What We Are Reading Today: Never Enough by Judith Grisel

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Updated 10 February 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Never Enough by Judith Grisel

Addiction is epidemic and catastrophic. With more than one in every five people over the age of 14 addicted, drug abuse has been called the most formidable health problem worldwide.

If we are not victims ourselves, we all know someone struggling with the merciless compulsion to alter their experience by changing how their brain functions.

Drawing on years of research — as well as personal experience as a recovered addict — researcher and professor Judy Grisel has reached a fundamental conclusion: For the addict, there will never be enough drugs.

In this book, Grisel shows how different drugs act on the brain, the kind of experiential effects they generate, and the specific reasons why each is so hard to kick, according to a review published on goodreads.com.

Grisel’s insights lead to a better understanding of the brain’s critical contributions to addictive behavior.


What We Are Reading Today: Divided Armies

Updated 23 February 2020

What We Are Reading Today: Divided Armies

Author: Jason Lyall

How do armies fight and what makes them victorious on the modern battlefield? In Divided Armies, Jason Lyall challenges long-standing answers to this classic question by linking the fate of armies to their levels of inequality.
Introducing the concept of military inequality, Lyall demonstrates how a state’s prewar choices about the citizenship status of ethnic groups within its population determine subsequent battlefield performance.
Treating certain ethnic groups as second-class citizens, either by subjecting them to state-sanctioned discrimination or, worse, violence, undermines interethnic trust, fuels grievances, and leads victimized soldiers to subvert military authorities once war begins.
The higher an army’s inequality, Lyall finds, the greater its rates of desertion, side-switching, casualties, and use of coercion to force soldiers to fight, says a review on the Princeton University Press website.
In a sweeping historical investigation, Lyall draws on Project Mars, a new dataset of 250 conventional wars fought since 1800, to test this argument.