Jamil and Bouthayna’s Arab love story revived at Maraya Concert Hall in AlUla

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The Lebanese Caracalla Dance Theatre group will be debuting a production of Jamil and Bouthayna’s love story in AlUla over Valentine's Day weekend. (Supplied)
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The Lebanese Caracalla Dance Theatre group will be debuting a production of Jamil and Bouthayna’s love story in AlUla over Valentine's Day weekend. (Supplied)
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The Lebanese Caracalla Dance Theatre group will be debuting a production of Jamil and Bouthayna’s love story in AlUla over Valentine's Day weekend. (Supplied)
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The Lebanese Caracalla Dance Theatre group will be debuting a production of Jamil and Bouthayna’s love story in AlUla over Valentine's Day weekend. (Supplied)
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Updated 13 February 2020

Jamil and Bouthayna’s Arab love story revived at Maraya Concert Hall in AlUla

  • A cast of singers, actors and performers from all over the world are participating in the production

ALULA: The Lebanese Caracalla Dance Theatre group will be debuting a production of Jamil and Bouthayna’s love story in AlUla, where it originally took place.

The show will run for three days starting Thursday at Maraya Concert Hall, where the spirit and magic of the East will be brought to life as part of the Winter at Tantora Festival.

“Jamil and Bouthayna” is a theatrical production that tells the legendary love story of the poet Jamil bin Ma’amar, who fell madly in love with Bouthayna Bint Hayyan.

The Royal Commission for AlUla (RCU) assigned the Caracalla Dance Theatre the task of retelling the romantic adventure inspired by an ancient love story born in the Arabian desert. The epic tale has been described by many as the Romeo and Juliet of the East.

A cast of singers, actors and performers from all over the world are participating in this mass production of “Jamil and Bouthayna” under the leadership of the founding maestro Abdel Halim Caracalla.

“We are delighted to partner with the RCU in its endeavor to raise the status of oriental arts and authentic Arab culture through this epic theatrical work,” said the maestro.

“This unique story was born in AlUla and introduced one of the most remarkable tales of immortal love that took place in the heart of the desert. The Winter at Tantora Festival is the perfect platform to bring this tale back to life for the world to see,” he added.

The story will be told through a variety of theatrical elements including poetry, musical composition, set and scenography design, video projection design, costume design, singing and choreography.

The performance will premiere in AlUla and could travel to theaters and festivals worldwide as a global message of culture, arts and civilization from the Kingdom.

The RCU has brought a variety of regional and international acts to Maraya Concert Hall throughout the duration of the festival.

The visually striking, mirror-walled venue can seat 500 guests and is fitted with a state-of-the-art sound system.

Organized by the RCU, the Winter at Tantora Festival features a wide range of cultural and artistic events inspired by the area’s heritage, which dates back thousands of years. In addition, there are a number of other activities and attractions, including markets, a winter garden, farms and the historic old town.

The festival continues each weekend until Mar. 7. It offers the final chance to visit AlUla’s heritage sites before they are closed to the public until October.


Houthis are ‘threat’ to Yemen, Saudi Arabia, and the entire region

A houthi rebel fighter holds his a weapon during a gathering aimed at mobilizing more fighters for the Houthi movement, in Sanaa, Yemen, Thursday, Feb. 20, 2020. (AP)
Updated 21 September 2020

Houthis are ‘threat’ to Yemen, Saudi Arabia, and the entire region

  • Five civilians injured in lastest attack at village in Jazan

JEDDAH: Houthi militias in Yemen are continuing to break international humanitarian law by targeting civilians in Saudi Arabia.
In its latest attacks on Saudi terrority, the group launched a projectile at a village in the southern Jazan region on Saturday. Five people were injured and property was damaged.
The Iran-backed militia has attacked Saudi Arabia’s territory, killing and injuring civilians in the process, since the start of the war in 2015, often to international condemnation.
“The Kingdom has tackled many Houthi attacks, which included ballistic missiles and drones that were originally intended to target civilians,” political analyst and international relations expert Dr. Hamdan Al-Shehri told Arab News. “If it wasn’t for the Kingdom’s instant response they would have caused very big damage.”
Al-Shehri said that a group like the Houthis were not expected to act differently, other than be violent and destructive. He pointed the finger at the international community for its silence as well as countries that have lifted an arms ban on Iran.
“The recently apprehended Houthi cell in Yemen smuggling Iranian weapons has admitted to receiving training in Iran, evidence of Iran’s continued involvement in Yemen. Therefore, this makes the US unilateral proclamation to reinforce UN sanctions against Iran the right thing to do now.”
Al-Shehri added that the militia was an organization whose activities would still endanger the lives of Yemeni civilians even if they did not harm neighboring countries. “They use cities as a shield and launch their rockets from inside Sanaa, among civilians.”
He said that the international community, as part of its responsibility to maintain global peace and security, was required to spare Yemenis the agony and scourge of war by implementing UN Security Council Resolution 2216 and bring the Houthis back to the negotiation table for an inclusive political solution.
“The Houthis are a threat to Yemen, Saudi Arabia, and the entire region as long as weapons remain in their hands,” Al-Shehri said.
The attack in Jazan was condemned by Egypt, Jordan and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC).
The OIC secretary-general, Yousef Al-Othaimeen, affirmed the organization’s standing and solidarity with the Kingdom in all the measures it took to protect its borders, citizens, and residents on its territory.