Jamil and Bouthayna’s Arab love story revived at Maraya Concert Hall in AlUla

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The Lebanese Caracalla Dance Theatre group will be debuting a production of Jamil and Bouthayna’s love story in AlUla over Valentine's Day weekend. (Supplied)
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The Lebanese Caracalla Dance Theatre group will be debuting a production of Jamil and Bouthayna’s love story in AlUla over Valentine's Day weekend. (Supplied)
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The Lebanese Caracalla Dance Theatre group will be debuting a production of Jamil and Bouthayna’s love story in AlUla over Valentine's Day weekend. (Supplied)
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The Lebanese Caracalla Dance Theatre group will be debuting a production of Jamil and Bouthayna’s love story in AlUla over Valentine's Day weekend. (Supplied)
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Updated 13 February 2020

Jamil and Bouthayna’s Arab love story revived at Maraya Concert Hall in AlUla

  • A cast of singers, actors and performers from all over the world are participating in the production

ALULA: The Lebanese Caracalla Dance Theatre group will be debuting a production of Jamil and Bouthayna’s love story in AlUla, where it originally took place.

The show will run for three days starting Thursday at Maraya Concert Hall, where the spirit and magic of the East will be brought to life as part of the Winter at Tantora Festival.

“Jamil and Bouthayna” is a theatrical production that tells the legendary love story of the poet Jamil bin Ma’amar, who fell madly in love with Bouthayna Bint Hayyan.

The Royal Commission for AlUla (RCU) assigned the Caracalla Dance Theatre the task of retelling the romantic adventure inspired by an ancient love story born in the Arabian desert. The epic tale has been described by many as the Romeo and Juliet of the East.

A cast of singers, actors and performers from all over the world are participating in this mass production of “Jamil and Bouthayna” under the leadership of the founding maestro Abdel Halim Caracalla.

“We are delighted to partner with the RCU in its endeavor to raise the status of oriental arts and authentic Arab culture through this epic theatrical work,” said the maestro.

“This unique story was born in AlUla and introduced one of the most remarkable tales of immortal love that took place in the heart of the desert. The Winter at Tantora Festival is the perfect platform to bring this tale back to life for the world to see,” he added.

The story will be told through a variety of theatrical elements including poetry, musical composition, set and scenography design, video projection design, costume design, singing and choreography.

The performance will premiere in AlUla and could travel to theaters and festivals worldwide as a global message of culture, arts and civilization from the Kingdom.

The RCU has brought a variety of regional and international acts to Maraya Concert Hall throughout the duration of the festival.

The visually striking, mirror-walled venue can seat 500 guests and is fitted with a state-of-the-art sound system.

Organized by the RCU, the Winter at Tantora Festival features a wide range of cultural and artistic events inspired by the area’s heritage, which dates back thousands of years. In addition, there are a number of other activities and attractions, including markets, a winter garden, farms and the historic old town.

The festival continues each weekend until Mar. 7. It offers the final chance to visit AlUla’s heritage sites before they are closed to the public until October.


Saudi minister calls on worshippers to respect safety measures in mosques

Updated 28 May 2020

Saudi minister calls on worshippers to respect safety measures in mosques

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia's minister of Islamic affairs called on Muslims to respect ongoing preventative measures to stop the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) inside mosques as the Kingdom eases some restrictions.

Sheikh Abdullatif Al-Asheikh said worshipers should bring their own prayer mats, wear masks and wash their hands prior to coming to the mosque to ensure the safety of other worshippers. 

Al-Asheikh said preventative measures will remain in place to ensure a safe return of worshipers to mosques for Friday prayers from May 31 until June 20, except in Makkah. 

Worshippers must keep two meters apart and leave a row of space empty between each row, he said.

The minister said the elderly and children under 15 should continue to avoid going to the mosque. 

The instructions follow other announcements in the Kingdom relaxing aspects of the lockdown, including reducing curfews and allowing freer movement of people.